paronym
noun Etymology: Late Latin paronymon, from Greek parōnymon, neuter of parōnymos Date: circa 1846 a paronymous word

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Paronym — Par o*nym, n. A paronymous word. [Written also {paronyme}.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • paronym — [par′ə nim] n. [Gr parōnymon, orig. neut. of parōnymos: see PARONYMOUS] a paronymous word …   English World dictionary

  • Paronym — Als Paronyme bezeichnet man verwechselbar ähnliche Wörter innerhalb einer Sprache und ihrer Dialekte. Ein Paronym wird auch als Falscher Bruder bezeichnet in Analogie zu dem ähnlich lautenden Falscher Freund, der sich auf Fremdsprachen bezieht,… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Paronym — A paronym or paronyme in linguistics may refer to two different things: # A word that is related to another word and derives from the same root, e.g. a cognate word; # Words which are almost homonyms, but have slight differences in spelling or… …   Wikipedia

  • paronym — par·o·nym || pærÉ™nɪm n. word derived from the same root as another word ( wise is a paronym of wisdom ); word that has the same sound as another word; form in one language for a word in a foreign language …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Paronym — См. parònimo …   Пятиязычный словарь лингвистических терминов

  • paronym — См. parònimo …   Пятиязычный словарь лингвистических терминов

  • paronym — paronymic, adj. /par euh nim/, n. Gram. a paronymous word. [1840 50; < Gk parónymon, neut. of parónymos formed by a slight change in name, derivative, equiv. to par PAR + onymos, adj. deriv. of ónyma NAME] * * * …   Universalium

  • paronym — noun A word derived from the same root, or with the same sound, as another word. See Also: antonym, homonym, synonym, heteronym, cognate …   Wiktionary

  • paronym — Expression used in Aristotle for terms that do not signify substances directly, but only indirectly, by picking out accidental qualities belonging to the substances. ‘Colour’ and ‘justice’ signify qualities, but ‘coloured’ and ‘just’ describe… …   Philosophy dictionary

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