paralanguage
noun Date: 1958 optional vocal effects (as tone of voice) that accompany or modify the phonemes of an utterance and that may communicate meaning

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Paralanguage — refers to the non verbal elements of communication used to modify meaning and convey emotion. Paralanguage may be expressed consciously or unconsciously, and it includes the pitch, volume, and, in some cases, intonation of speech. Sometimes the… …   Wikipedia

  • paralanguage — (n.) 1958, from PARA (Cf. para ) + LANGUAGE (Cf. language) …   Etymology dictionary

  • paralanguage — [par′ə laŋ΄gwij] n. nonverbal means of communication, such as tone of voice, laughter, and, sometimes, gestures and facial expressions, that accompany speech and convey further meaning …   English World dictionary

  • paralanguage — /par euh lang gwij/, n. Ling. vocal features that accompany speech and contribute to communication but are not generally considered to be part of the language system, as vocal quality, loudness, and tempo: sometimes also including facial… …   Universalium

  • paralanguage — noun The non verbal elements of communication used to modify meaning and convey emotion, such as pitch, volume, and intonation …   Wiktionary

  • paralanguage — The various non semantic aspects of speech (such as volume, pitch, and emphasis) by which individuals communicate meaning …   Dictionary of sociology

  • paralanguage — n. non verbal vocal features that accompany speech in order to communicate specific meanings …   English contemporary dictionary

  • paralanguage — noun the non lexical component of communication by speech, for example intonation, hesitation noises, gesture, and facial expression …   English new terms dictionary

  • paralanguage — para·language …   English syllables

  • paralanguage — par•a•lan•guage [[t]ˈpær əˌlæŋ gwɪdʒ[/t]] n. ling. features that accompany speech and contribute to communication but are not considered part of the language system, esp. vocal features, as voice quality • Etymology: 1955–60 …   From formal English to slang

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