oxter
noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots), alteration of Old English ōxta; akin to Old English eax axis, axle — more at axis Date: 15th century 1. chiefly Scottish & Irish armpit 1 2. chiefly Scottish & Irish arm

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Oxter — Ox ter, n. [AS. [=o]hsta.] The armpit; also, the arm. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • oxter — ► NOUN Scottish & N. English ▪ a person s armpit. ORIGIN Old English …   English terms dictionary

  • oxter — noun The armpit. And begob there he was passing the door with his books under his oxter and the wife beside him and Corny Kelleher with his wall eye looking in as they went past …   Wiktionary

  • oxter — I Scottish Vernacular Dictionary noun: An armpit. Example: S mibbe Feb ry, bit it s aye Augist in alow yir oxters II Cleveland Dialect List the arm pit III North Country (Newcastle) Words the arm hole or pit IV Mid Ulster English armpit, under… …   English dialects glossary

  • Oxter — armpit (Put the pipes under your oxter) …   Scottish slang

  • oxter — /ok steuhr/, n. Scot. and North Eng. the armpit. [1490 1500; akin to OE ocusta armpit, ON (h)ostr throat] * * * …   Universalium

  • oxter — n. (Scottish and Irish) armpit; arm v. walk arm in arm; take under the arm …   English contemporary dictionary

  • oxter — [ ɒkstə] noun Scottish & N. English a person s armpit. Origin OE ōhsta, ōxta …   English new terms dictionary

  • oxter — ox·ter …   English syllables

  • oxter — To walk arm in arm …   Grandiloquent dictionary

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