oxlip
noun Etymology: Middle English *oxeslippe, from Old English oxanslyppe, literally, ox dung, from oxa ox + slypa, slyppe paste — more at slip Date: before 12th century a Eurasian primula (Primula elatior) having usually yellow flowers

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Oxlip — Ox lip , n. [AS. oxanslyppe. See {Ox}, and {Cowslip}.] (Bot.) The great cowslip ({Primula veris}, var. elatior). [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • oxlip — [äks′lip΄] n. 〚OE oxanslyppe < oxan, gen. of oxa (see OX) + slyppe, dropping: see SLIP3〛 a perennial plant (Primula elatior) of the primrose family, having yellow flowers in early spring * * * ox·lip (ŏksʹlĭp ) n. A Eurasian primrose (Primula… …   Universalium

  • oxlip — [äks′lip΄] n. [OE oxanslyppe < oxan, gen. of oxa (see OX) + slyppe, dropping: see SLIP3] a perennial plant (Primula elatior) of the primrose family, having yellow flowers in early spring …   English World dictionary

  • oxlip — noun 1》 a woodland primula with yellow flowers that hang down one side of the stem. [Primula elatior.] 2》 (also false oxlip) a natural hybrid between a primrose and a cowslip. Origin OE oxanslyppe, from oxa ox + slyppe slime ; cf. cowslip …   English new terms dictionary

  • oxlip — noun The plant Primula elatior, similar to cowslip but with larger, pale yellow flowers …   Wiktionary

  • oxlip — North Country (Newcastle) Words the greater cowslip …   English dialects glossary

  • oxlip — n. low growing forest plant with small yellow flowers …   English contemporary dictionary

  • oxlip — ox·lip …   English syllables

  • oxlip — /ˈɒkslɪp/ (say okslip) noun a species of primrose, Primula elatior, with pale yellow flowers. {Middle English, from Old English oxanslyppe, from oxan ox s + slyppe slime. See slip3, and compare cowslip} …   Australian English dictionary

  • oxlip —  a cowslip. Ess. This flower probably derives its name from its sweetness, compared to the breath or lip of a cow or ox …   A glossary of provincial and local words used in England

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