aware

aware
adjective Etymology: Middle English iwar, from Old English gewær, from ge- (associative prefix) + wær wary — more at co-, wary Date: before 12th century 1. archaic watchful, wary 2. having or showing realization, perception, or knowledgeawareness noun Synonyms: aware, cognizant, conscious, sensible, alive, awake mean having knowledge of something. aware implies vigilance in observing or alertness in drawing inferences from what one experiences <
aware of changes in climate
>
. cognizant implies having special or certain knowledge as from firsthand sources <
not fully cognizant of the facts
>
. conscious implies that one is focusing one's attention on something or is even preoccupied by it <
conscious that my heart was pounding
>
. sensible implies direct or intuitive perceiving especially of intangibles or of emotional states or qualities <
sensible of a teacher's influence
>
. alive adds to sensible the implication of acute sensitivity to something <
alive to the thrill of danger
>
. awake implies that one has become alive to something and is on the alert <
a country always awake to the threat of invasion
>
.

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • aware — 1. Aware is generally predicative in use, i.e. it stands after a noun or as a complement after a verb such as be, become, grow, seem, etc. It can be followed by of or a that clause: • I had to be aware of…the balance between committed pro… …   Modern English usage

  • aware — aware, cognizant, conscious, sensible, alive, awake mean having knowledge of something, especially of something that for some reason is not obvious or apparent to all. One is aware of something through information or through one’s own vigilance… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • AWARE —    Aware, or mono no aware, is a classical Japanese term used to describe the Buddhist notion of the transience of things and is often used in situations where one is moved (aware) upon seeing tangible things (mono) come to an end. Aware was… …   Japanese literature and theater

  • aware — aware; aware·ness; re·aware; un·aware; un·aware·ly; un·aware·ness; …   English syllables

  • Aware — A*ware , a. [OE. iwar, AS. gew[ae]r, fr. w[ae]r wary. The pref. ge orig. meant together, completely. ?. See {Wary}.] 1. Watchful; vigilant or on one s guard against danger or difficulty. [1913 Webster] 2. Apprised; informed; cognizant; conscious; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • aware — [ə wer′] adj. [ME < OE gewær < wær, cautious: see WARN] 1. Obs. on one s guard; vigilant 2. knowing or realizing; conscious; informed awareness n. SYN. AWARE implies having knowledge of something through alertness in observing or in… …   English World dictionary

  • aware — index acute, artful, cognizant, guarded, knowing, learned, literate, perceptive, receptive …   Law dictionary

  • aware — (adj.) late O.E. gewær, from P.Gmc. *ga waraz (Cf. O.S. giwar, M.Du. gheware, O.H.G. giwar, Ger. gewahr), from *ga intensive prefix + wær wary, cautious (see WARY (Cf. wary)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • aware — [adj] knowledgeable acquainted, alert, alive, appraised, appreciative, apprehensive, apprised, attentive, au courant, awake, cognizant, conscious, cool*, enlightened, familiar, go go*, groovy*, grounded*, heedful, hip*, informed, in the know*, in …   New thesaurus

  • aware — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ having knowledge or perception of a situation or fact. DERIVATIVES awareness noun. ORIGIN Old English …   English terms dictionary

  • aware — a|ware W1S1 [əˈweə US əˈwer] adj [not before noun] [: Old English; Origin: gewAr, from wAr; WARY] 1.) if you are aware that a situation exists, you realize or know that it exists aware of ▪ The children are aware of the danger of taking drugs. ▪… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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