no-tillage
noun Date: 1968 a system of farming that consists of planting a narrow slit trench without tillage and with the use of herbicides to suppress weeds

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • no-tillage — /noʊ ˈtɪlɪdʒ/ (say noh tilij) noun 1. a system of conservation tillage in which no cultivations are done during the fallow period between consecutive crops, the crop being planted by direct drilling and weeds controlled as necessary by herbicides …   Australian English dictionary

  • no-tillage — no till·age …   English syllables

  • no-tillage — /noh til ij/, n. the planting of crops by direct seeding without plowing, using herbicides as necessary to control weeds. Also, no till. Also called minimum tillage, zero tillage. [1965 70] * * * …   Universalium

  • no-tillage — ə̇j, ēj noun : a system of farming that consists of planting a narrow slit trench without tillage and with the use of herbicides to suppress weeds …   Useful english dictionary

  • no-till — /ˈnoʊ tɪl/ (say noh til) adjective of or relating to the system of no tillage …   Australian English dictionary

  • no-till — (ˈ)nōˈtil noun : no tillage herein …   Useful english dictionary

  • No-till farming — The article Conservation tillage redirects to this page. This article primarily discusses No till farming, which is one of several different conservation tillage techniques. Some others are Strip till and Minimum tillage …   Wikipedia

  • Tillage — Cultivating after early rain. Tillage is the agricultural preparation of the soil by mechanical agitation of various types, such as digging, stirring, and overturning. Examples of human powered tilling methods using hand tools include …   Wikipedia

  • No till — Direktsämaschine von John Deere Unter Direktsaat wird eine Saatmethode ohne vorherige Bodenbearbeitung verstanden. Direktsaat ist definiert als „Bestellung ohne jegliche Bodenbearbeitung seit der vorangegangenen Ernte. Scheibenmaschinen öffnen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • no-till — noun Date: 1968 no tillage …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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