nonsupport
noun Date: 1909 failure to support; specifically failure (as of a parent) to honor a statutory or contractual obligation to provide maintenance

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • nonsupport — non·sup·port /ˌnän sə pȯrt/ n: failure (as of a parent) to honor a statutory or contractual obligation to provide support; also: the crime of such failure to support Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. nonsupport …   Law dictionary

  • nonsupport — [nän΄sə pôrt′] n. failure to provide for a spouse, child, or other legal dependent …   English World dictionary

  • nonsupport — The failure or neglect unreasonably to support those to whom an obligation of support is due; e.g. duty of parents to support children; duty to support spouse. Such failure to support is a criminal offense in most states. See e.g. Model Penal… …   Black's law dictionary

  • nonsupport — The failure or neglect unreasonably to support those to whom an obligation of support is due; e.g. duty of parents to support children; duty to support spouse. Such failure to support is a criminal offense in most states. See e.g. Model Penal… …   Black's law dictionary

  • nonsupport — | ̷ ̷+ noun 1. : lack of support : failure to support use the threat of nonsupport … to bring recalcitrants in his party to heel R.H.Rovere 2. : failure on the part of one under obligation either by contract or by statutory liability to provide… …   Useful english dictionary

  • nonsupport — /non seuh pawrt , pohrt /, n. Law. failure to support a spouse, child, or other dependent as required by law. [1905 10; NON + SUPPORT] * * * …   Universalium

  • nonsupport — noun a) A lack of support b) The failure to provide for ones family or other dependents …   Wiktionary

  • nonsupport — n. lack of support …   English contemporary dictionary

  • nonsupport — non·support …   English syllables

  • nonsupport — non•sup•port [[t]ˌnɒn səˈpɔrt, ˈpoʊrt[/t]] n. law failure to provide financial support for a spouse, child, or other dependent • Etymology: 1905–10 …   From formal English to slang

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