no-hoper
noun Date: circa 1943 chiefly British one that has no chance of success

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • no-hoper — n BrE a person or animal who you think has no chance of winning something or of being successful ▪ a bunch of complete no hopers …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • no-hoper — /noʊ ˈhoʊpə / (say noh hohpuh) noun Colloquial 1. someone who displays marked incompetence: he is a real no hoper at tennis. 2. a social misfit. 3. a social outcast, vagrant. 4. an unpromising animal, as a second rate racehorse, greyhound, etc …   Australian English dictionary

  • no-hoper — ► NOUN informal ▪ a person who is not expected to be successful …   English terms dictionary

  • no-hoper — UK [ˌnəʊ ˈhəʊpə(r)] / US [ˌnoʊ ˈhoʊpər] noun [countable] Word forms no hoper : singular no hoper plural no hopers British informal an insulting way of referring to someone who seems likely to fail at something, or likely never to be successful at …   English dictionary

  • no-hoper —    Used to a person who is thought to have no hope of advancing socially or professionally. ‘You failed no hoper’ is used by an actor to his director in N.J.Crisp’s Festival: What makes you think, you failed no hoper, that you can come in here… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • no-hoper — ˈnōˈhōpə(r) noun Etymology: from the phrase no hope + er Australia : a shiftless individual without ideals or ambitions …   Useful english dictionary

  • no-hoper — /noh hoh peuhr/, n. a useless person from whom nothing can be expected. [1940 45; no hope + ER1] * * * …   Universalium

  • no-hoper — noun Something that has no hope of success …   Wiktionary

  • No-hoper — 1. somebody who ll never do well; someone who is hopeless; 2. unpromising animal, as a second rate racehorse, greyhound, etc …   Dictionary of Australian slang

  • no-hoper — Australian Slang 1. somebody who ll never do well; someone who is hopeless; 2. unpromising animal, as a second rate racehorse, greyhound, etc …   English dialects glossary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”