nectary
noun (plural -taries) Etymology: New Latin nectarium, irregular from Latin nectar + -arium -ary Date: 1759 a plant gland that secretes nectar

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Nectary — Nec ta*ry, n.; pl. {Nectaries}. [From {Nectar}: cf. F. nectaire.] (Bot.) That part of a blossom which secretes nectar, usually the base of the corolla or petals; also, the spur of such flowers as the larkspur and columbine, whether nectariferous… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • nectary — [nek′tər ē] n. pl. nectaries [ModL nectarium] an organ or part, esp. of a flower, that secretes nectar nectarial [nek′ter′ē əl] adj …   English World dictionary

  • nectary — nectaried, adj. /nek teuh ree/, n., pl. nectaries. 1. Bot. an organ or part that secretes nectar. 2. Entomol. a cornicle (formerly thought to secrete honeydew). [1590 1600; < NL nectarium. See NECTAR, Y3] * * * …   Universalium

  • nectary — noun A gland that secretes nectar …   Wiktionary

  • nectary — noun (plural nectaries) Botany a nectar secreting glandular organ in a flower or on a leaf or stem …   English new terms dictionary

  • nectary — nec·ta·ry …   English syllables

  • nectary — nec•ta•ry [[t]ˈnɛk tə ri[/t]] n. pl. ries bot an organ or part of a plant that secretes nectar • Etymology: 1590–1600; < NL nectarium. See nectar, y III nec′ta•ried, adj …   From formal English to slang

  • nectary — /ˈnɛktəri/ (say nektuhree) noun (plural nectaries) 1. Botany an organ or part, usually of a flower, that secretes nectar. 2. Entomology one of a pair of small abdominal tubes from which aphids secrete honeydew. {New Latin nectarium} –nectarial… …   Australian English dictionary

  • nectary — n. (pl. ies) the nectar secreting organ of a flower or plant. Etymology: mod.L nectarium (as NECTAR) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Proper nectary — Proper Prop er, a. [OE. propre, F. propre, fr. L. proprius. Cf. {Appropriate}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Belonging to one; one s own; individual. His proper good [i. e., his own possessions]. Chaucer. My proper son. Shak. [1913 Webster] Now learn the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”