nastic
adjective Etymology: Greek nastos close-pressed, from nassein to press Date: 1908 of, relating to, or constituting a movement of a plant part caused by disproportionate growth or increase of turgor in one surface

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • -nastic — [nas′tik] combining form nastic by some (specified) means or in some (specified) direction [epinastic, hyponastic] …   English World dictionary

  • nastic — [nas′tik] adj. [< Gr nastos, pressed close < nassein, to press, squeeze close + IC] designating, of, or exhibiting movement or change in position of a plant or its parts, as in the opening and closing of flowers, in response to a stimulus… …   English World dictionary

  • Nastic — Gimnàstic Voller Name Gimnàstic de Tarragona Gegründet 1914 Stadion Nou Estadi Plätze …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • -nastic — a combining form occurring in adjectives corresponding to nouns ending in nasty: hyponastic. [see NASTIC] * * * …   Universalium

  • nastic — adjective Relates to the response of a plant to a stimulus that does not depend on the location of the stimulus. Many flowers close themselves at night, this nastic movement is in reponse to the brightness of the sky …   Wiktionary

  • -nastic — a combining form occurring in adjectives corresponding to nouns ending in nasty: hyponastic. [see NASTIC] …   Useful english dictionary

  • nastic — /nas tik/, adj. Bot. of or showing sufficiently greater cellular force or growth on one side of an axis to change the form or position of the axis. [1900 10; < Gk nast(ós) pressed close, stamped down, firm (equiv. to nad s. of nássein to press,… …   Universalium

  • nastic — [ nastɪk] adjective Botany (of the movement of plant parts) caused by an external stimulus but unaffected in direction by it. Origin early 20th cent.: from Gk nastos squeezed together + ic …   English new terms dictionary

  • nastic — nas·tic …   English syllables

  • nastic — nas•tic [[t]ˈnæs tɪk[/t]] adj. bot of or pertaining to movement in a plant part in response to cellular changes in growth or pressure • Etymology: 1900–10; < Gk nast(ós) pressed close, stamped down (v. adj. of nássein to press) …   From formal English to slang

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