mosasaur
noun Etymology: New Latin Mosasaurus, from Latin Mosa the river Meuse + Greek sauros lizard Date: 1841 any of a family (Mosasauridae) of very large extinct marine fish-eating lizards of the Upper Cretaceous with limbs modified into paddles that are related to the recent monitor lizards

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Mosasaur — Mos a*saur, Mosasaurian Mos a*sau ri*an, n. (Paleon.) One of an extinct order of reptiles, including {Mosasaurus} and allied genera. See {Mosasauria}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mosasaur — Mosasaurs Temporal range: Late Cretaceous …   Wikipedia

  • Mosasaur — Mosasauridae Mosasauridae …   Wikipédia en Français

  • mosasaur — /moh seuh sawr /, n. any of several extinct carnivorous marine lizards from the Cretaceous Period, having the limbs modified into broad, webbed paddles. [ < NL Mosasaurus (1823) genus name, equiv. to L Mosa the MEUSE river (where a species was… …   Universalium

  • mosasaur — noun An extinct marine reptile, in the family Mosasauridae; the ancestor of modern snakes …   Wiktionary

  • mosasaur — n. any of a type of now extinct fish lizards of the family Mosasauridae …   English contemporary dictionary

  • mosasaur — [ məʊzəsɔ:] noun a large fossil marine reptile with paddle like limbs and a long flattened tail. Origin C19: from mod. L. Mosasaurus, from L. Mosa, the river Meuse (near which it was first discovered) + Gk sauros lizard …   English new terms dictionary

  • mosasaur — mo·sa·saur …   English syllables

  • mosasaur — mo•sa•saur [[t]ˈmoʊ səˌsɔr[/t]] n. pal any of several extinct carnivorous marine lizards from the Cretaceous Period, having the limbs modified into broad, webbed paddles • Etymology: < NL Mosasaurus (1823) genus name = L Mosa the Muse river… …   From formal English to slang

  • mosasaur — ˈmōsəˌsȯ(ə)r noun ( s) Etymology: New Latin Mosasaurus : a reptile of the genus Mosasaurus or the family Mosasauridae …   Useful english dictionary

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