monk's cloth
noun Date: circa 1847 a coarse heavy fabric in basket weave made originally of worsted and used for monk's habits but now chiefly of cotton or linen and used for draperies

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Monk's cloth — is an evenweave cloth which is used in Swedish weaving and many other evenweave projects. This cloth has a loose over and under four strand weave. These strands are called floats and are used to weave the threads through. The cloth is 100% cotton …   Wikipedia

  • monk's cloth — n. 1. Historical a worsted cloth used for monks garments 2. a heavy cloth, as of cotton, with a basket weave, used for drapes, etc …   English World dictionary

  • monk's cloth — monk s′ cloth n. tex a heavy cotton fabric in a basket weave used for curtains, bedspreads, etc • Etymology: 1840–50 …   From formal English to slang

  • monk's cloth — noun a heavy cloth in basket weave • Hypernyms: ↑fabric, ↑cloth, ↑material, ↑textile * * * noun : a coarse heavy fabric in basket weave made originally of worsted and used for monk s habits but now chiefly of cotton or linen and used for… …   Useful english dictionary

  • monk's cloth — a heavy cotton fabric in a basket weave, used for curtains, bedspreads, etc. [1840 50] * * * …   Universalium

  • friar's cloth — noun : monk s cloth …   Useful english dictionary

  • monk'scloth — monk s cloth (mŭngks) n. A heavy cotton cloth in a coarse basket weave, now used chiefly for draperies. * * * …   Universalium

  • Monk — For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). St. Anthony the Great, considered the Father of Christian Monasticism A monk (from Greek: μοναχός, monachos, single, solitary [1]) is a person who practices religious asceticism, living either alone or… …   Wikipedia

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  • Hell's Kitchen (U.S. season 5) — Contents 1 Chef and staff members 2 Contestants 3 Contestant progress …   Wikipedia

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