macrofossil
noun Date: 1937 a fossil large enough to be observed by direct inspection

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • Macrofossil — Macrofossils (occasionally spelled macro fossil ) are preserved organic remains large enough to be visible without a microscope. Most fossils discussed in the article Fossil are macrofossils. Macrofossil contrasted with Microfossil The term… …   Wikipedia

  • macrofossil — /mak reuh fos il/, n. a fossil large enough to be studied and identified without the use of a microscope. Cf. microfossil. [1935 40; MACRO + FOSSIL] * * * …   Universalium

  • macrofossil — noun Any fossil large enough to be examined without a microscope …   Wiktionary

  • macrofossil — mac·ro·fossil …   English syllables

  • macrofossil — |makrō+ noun Etymology: macr + fossil : a fossil large enough to be observed by direct inspection compare microfossil * * * /mak reuh fos il/, n. a fossil large enough to be studied and identified without the use of a microscope. Cf. microfossil …   Useful english dictionary

  • Paleozoology — Paleozoology, also spelled as palaeozoology (Greek: παλαιον, paleon = old and ζωον, zoon = animal), is the branch of paleontology or paleobiology dealing with the recovery and identification of multicellular animal remains from geological (or… …   Wikipedia

  • Flowering plant — Flowering plants Temporal range: Early Cretaceous Recent …   Wikipedia

  • Invertebrate paleontology — (also spelled Invertebrate palaeontology) is sometimes described as Invertebrate paleozoology and/or Invertebrate paleobiology. Whether it is considered to be a subfield of paleontology, paleozoology, and/or paleobiology, this discipline is the… …   Wikipedia

  • Charnia — Temporal range: Ediacaran, 575–545 Ma[1] …   Wikipedia

  • Paleobotany — Paleobotany, also spelled as palaeobotany (from the Greek words paleon = old and botany , study of plants), is the branch of paleontology or paleobiology dealing with the recovery and identification of plant remains from geological contexts, and… …   Wikipedia

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