assert
transitive verb Etymology: Latin assertus, past participle of asserere, from ad- + serere to join — more at series Date: circa 1604 1. to state or declare positively and often forcefully or aggressively 2. a. to demonstrate the existence of <
assert his manhood — James Joyce
>
b. posit, postulate Synonyms: assert, declare, affirm, protest, avow mean to state positively usually in anticipation of denial or objection. assert implies stating confidently without need for proof or regard for evidence <
asserted that modern music is just noise
>
. declare stresses open or public statement <
declared her support for the candidate
>
. affirm implies conviction based on evidence, experience, or faith <
affirmed the existence of an afterlife
>
. protest emphasizes affirming in the face of denial or doubt <
protested that he really had been misquoted
>
. avow stresses frank declaration and acknowledgment of personal responsibility for what is declared <
avowed that all investors would be repaid in full
>
. Synonym: see in addition maintain.

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Assert — As*sert , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Asserted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Asserting}.] [L. assertus, p. p. of asserere to join or fasten to one s self, claim, maintain; ad + serere to join or bind together. See {Series}.] 1. To affirm; to declare with assurance …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • assert — 1 Assert, declare, profess, affirm, aver, protest, avouch, avow, predicate, warrant agree in meaning to state positively usually either in anticipation of denial or objection or in the face of it. Assert implies absence of proof: it usually… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • assert — [ə sʉrt′] vt. [< L assertus, pp. of asserere, to join to, claim < ad , to + serere, join: see SERIES] 1. to state positively; declare; affirm 2. to maintain or defend (rights, claims, etc.) assert oneself to insist on one s rights, or on… …   English World dictionary

  • assert — as·sert /ə sərt/ vt: to present and demand recognition of assert a claim as·ser·tion /ə sər shən/ n Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • assert — c.1600, declare, from L. assertus, pp. of asserere claim, maintain, affirm (see ASSERTION (Cf. assertion)). Related: Asserted; asserting. To assert oneself stand up for one s rights is recorded from 1879 …   Etymology dictionary

  • assert — ► VERB 1) state (a fact or belief) confidently and forcefully. 2) cause others to recognize (something) by confident and forceful behaviour. 3) (assert oneself) be confident and forceful. ORIGIN Latin asserere claim, affirm …   English terms dictionary

  • assert — [v] insist, declare, maintain advance, affirm, allege, argue, asservate, attest, aver, avouch, avow, butt in*, cite, claim, contend, defend, horn in, justify, mouth off*, pop off*, predicate, press, proclaim, profess, pronounce, protest, put… …   New thesaurus

  • Assert — Die Artikel Assertion (Informatik) und Zusicherung (Softwaretechnik) überschneiden sich thematisch. Hilf mit, die Artikel besser voneinander abzugrenzen oder zu vereinigen. Beteilige dich dazu an der Diskussion über diese Überschneidungen. Bitte… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • assert */*/ — UK [əˈsɜː(r)t] / US [əˈsɜrt] verb [transitive] Word forms assert : present tense I/you/we/they assert he/she/it asserts present participle asserting past tense asserted past participle asserted 1) a) to state firmly that something is true He has… …   English dictionary

  • assert — as|sert [əˈsə:t US ə:rt] v [T] [Date: 1600 1700; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of asserere, from ad to + serere to join ] 1.) to state firmly that something is true ▪ French cooking, she asserted, is the best in the world. assert that ▪ He… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • assert — [[t]əsɜ͟ː(r)t[/t]] asserts, asserting, asserted 1) VERB If someone asserts a fact or belief, they state it firmly. [FORMAL] [V that] Mr. Helm plans to assert that the bill violates the First Amendment... [V n] The defendants, who continue to… …   English dictionary

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