ascribe
transitive verb (ascribed; ascribing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin ascribere, from ad- + scribere to write — more at scribe Date: 15th century to refer to a supposed cause, source, or author • ascribable adjective Synonyms: ascribe, attribute, assign, impute, credit mean to lay something to the account of a person or thing. ascribe suggests an inferring or conjecturing of cause, quality, authorship <
forged paintings formerly ascribed to masters
>
. attribute suggests less tentativeness than ascribe, less definiteness than assign <
attributed to Rembrandt but possibly done by an associate
>
. assign implies ascribing with certainty or after deliberation <
assigned the bones to the Cretaceous Period
>
. impute suggests ascribing something that brings discredit by way of accusation or blame <
tried to impute sinister motives to my actions
>
. credit implies ascribing a thing or especially an action to a person or other thing as its agent, source, or explanation <
credited his teammates for his success
>
.

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Ascribe — As*cribe , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ascribed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ascribing}.] [L. ascribere, adscribere, to ascribe; ad + scribere to write: cf. OF. ascrire. See {Scribe}.] 1. To attribute, impute, or refer, as to a cause; as, his death was ascribed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ascribe — [ə skrīb′] vt. ascribed, ascribing [ME ascriben (also ascriven < OFr ascriv , stem of ascrire) < L ascribere < ad , to + scribere, to write: see SCRIBE] 1. to assign (something) to a supposed cause; impute; attribute 2. to regard… …   English World dictionary

  • ascribe — I verb accord, accredit, adsignare, affiliate, allege to belong, apply, appropriate, ascribere, assign, attach, attribuere, attribute, charge with, connect with, credit with, derive from, filiate, give, impute, point to, predicate, refer to,… …   Law dictionary

  • ascribe — ► VERB (ascribe to) 1) attribute (a particular cause, person, or period) to. 2) regard (a quality) as belonging to. DERIVATIVES ascribable adjective ascription noun. ORIGIN Latin ascribere, from scribere write …   English terms dictionary

  • ascribe — (v.) mid 14c., ascrive, from O.Fr. ascrivre to inscribe; attribute, impute, from L. ascribere to write in, to add to in a writing, from ad to (see AD (Cf. ad )) + scribere to write (see SCRIPT (Cf. script)). Spelling restored by 16c. Related …   Etymology dictionary

  • ascribe — ascribe, attribute, impute, assign, refer, credit, accredit, charge mean to lay something (creditable, discreditable, or neutral) to the account of a person or thing. The first four of these words are often used interchangeably without marked… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • ascribe — [v] assign to source accredit, attribute, charge, credit, hang on, impute, lay, pin on*, refer, reference, set down; concepts 39,49 …   New thesaurus

  • ascribe — [[t]əskra͟ɪb[/t]] ascribes, ascribing, ascribed 1) VERB If you ascribe an event or condition to a particular cause, you say or consider that it was caused by that thing. [FORMAL] [V n to n] An autopsy eventually ascribed the baby s death to… …   English dictionary

  • ascribe — as|cribe [əˈskraıb] v ascribe to / [ascribe sth to sb/sth] phr v [Date: 1400 1500; : Old French; Origin: ascrivre, from Latin ascribere, from ad to + scribere to write ] 1.) to claim that something is caused by a particular person, situation etc… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • ascribe — as|cribe [ ə skraıb ] verb a scribe to phrasal verb transitive FORMAL 1. ) ascribe something to something to believe something is the cause of something else: Their defeat was ascribed to a poor defense. 2. ) ascribe something to… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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