lashings
also lashins noun plural Etymology: from gerund of 1lash Date: 1829 chiefly British a great plenty ; abundance <
piles of bread and butter and lashings of tea — Molly Weir
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • lashings — ► PLURAL NOUN Brit. informal ▪ a copious amount of something, especially food or drink …   English terms dictionary

  • lashings — /lash ingz/, n. (used with a pl. v.) Chiefly Brit. Informal. an abundance; plenty (usually fol. by of): strawberries with lashings of cream. [1820 30; LASH1 (def. 16) + ING1 + S3] * * * …   Universalium

  • lashings — Everyday English Slang in Ireland n a lot i.e. lashings of food …   English dialects glossary

  • lashings — UK [ˈlæʃɪŋz] / US noun [plural] 1) British old fashioned a large quantity of something, especially food or drink strong tea with lashings of sugar 2) the ropes used to tie one thing to another or two things together …   English dictionary

  • lashings — lash•ings [[t]ˈlæʃ ɪŋz[/t]] n. pl. brit. an abundance; plenty: strawberries with lashings of cream[/ex] • Etymology: 1820–30; fig. use of lash I+ ing I …   From formal English to slang

  • lashings — lash|ings [ læʃıŋz ] noun plural the ropes used to tie one thing to another or two things together …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • lashings — n. plenty, abundance (British Slang) lash·ing || læʃɪŋ n. act of striking with a lash; whipping; harsh scolding; act of tying with a cord …   English contemporary dictionary

  • lashings — 1) hassling 2) slashing …   Anagrams dictionary

  • lashings — plural noun Brit. informal a copious amount of something, especially food or drink …   English new terms dictionary

  • lashings — lash·ings …   English syllables

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