jerk around

jerk around
transitive verb Date: 1932 to treat badly especially by being underhanded or inconsistent

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • jerk around — transitive verb : to treat badly especially in an underhanded or inconsistent way the public gets jerked around by all this confusing information Arnold Relman * * * jerk around [phrasal verb] jerk (someone) around chiefly US, informal : to be… …   Useful english dictionary

  • jerk around — phrasal verb Word forms jerk around : present tense I/you/we/they jerk around he/she/it jerks around present participle jerking around past tense jerked around past participle jerked around mainly American informal 1) jerk someone around… …   English dictionary

  • jerk around — in. to waste time. □ Stop jerking around and get to work. □ All you do is jerk around. Get a move on! …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • jerk around — jerk (someone) around to deceive someone about whether or not you intend to do something. They ve been jerking us around for a long time, first by not offering us a contract or then by saying they won t sign one …   New idioms dictionary

  • jerk around — PHRASAL VERB If you say that someone is jerking you around, you mean that they are not being honest with you about something. [INFORMAL] [V n P] Don t jerk me around, Mr Crook... [V n P] We re being jerked around, and I don t like it …   English dictionary

  • jerk around — v Mislead. Recently it seems like everyone is jerking me around. 1950s …   Historical dictionary of American slang

  • jerk around — verb to cheat or treat unfairly …   Wiktionary

  • jerk around — v. harass or waste somebody s time …   English slang

  • jerk — ► NOUN 1) a quick, sharp, sudden movement. 2) Weightlifting the raising of a barbell above the head from shoulder level by an abrupt straightening of the arms and legs. 3) informal, chiefly N. Amer. a contemptibly foolish person. ► VERB 1) move… …   English terms dictionary

  • jerk — jerk1 [dʒə:k US dʒə:rk] v [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: Probably from yerk to hit, pull suddenly (16 19 centuries)] 1.) [I and T] to move with a quick sudden movement, or to make part of your body move in this way ▪ Wilcox jerked his head to indicate …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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