verb Etymology: back-formation from jelly Date: 1869 intransitive verb 1. to come to the consistency of jelly ; congeal, set 2. to take shape and achieve distinctness ; become cohesive transitive verb to cause to jell

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Jell — Jell, v. i. 1. To jelly. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] 2. To take on a more concrete or substantial form; of ideas, plans, programs, etc. [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Jell — may refer to:*Gel, an apparently solid, jelly like material *Gelatin dessert, also known as jelly , a sweet or savoury food gel …   Wikipedia

  • jell — [dʒel] v another spelling of ↑gel …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • jell — [ dʒel ] verb intransitive if a thought or idea jells, it becomes clearer or more definite …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • jell — (v.) 1830, Amer.Eng. probably a back formation of JELLY (Cf. jelly). Related: Jelled; jelling. Figurative sense is first attested 1908. M.E. had gelen congeal, but it disappeared 15c …   Etymology dictionary

  • jell — jell, jelly vb *coagulate, congeal, set, curdle, clot Analogous words: solidify, *harden: cohere, *stick: *compact, consolidate …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • jell — [v] coagulate clot, cohere, come together, condense, congeal, crystallize, finalize, form, freeze, gel, gelate, gelatinize, harden, jellify, jelly, materialize, set, solidify, stick, stiffen, take shape, thicken; concepts 250,469 Ant. liquidate,… …   New thesaurus

  • jell — (also gel) ► VERB (jelled, jelling) 1) (of jelly or a similar substance) set or become firmer. 2) take definite form or begin to work well …   English terms dictionary

  • jell — ☆ jell [jel ] vi., vt. [back form. < JELLY] 1. a) to become or cause to become jelly b) to become or cause to become somewhat firm, as gelatin does; set 2. Informal to take or cause to take definite form; crystallize [plans that haven t jelled …   English World dictionary

  • jell — 01. It took a while for the class to [jell], but the students are really supportive of each other now. 02. John Lennon and Paul McCartney [jelled] from the time they first met and together wrote some of the greatest pop songs of their generation …   Grammatical examples in English

  • jell — /jel/, v.i. 1. to congeal; become jellylike in consistency. 2. to become clear, substantial, or definite; crystallize: The plan began to jell once we all met to discuss it. v.t. 3. to cause to jell. [1820 30; back formation from JELLY] * * * …   Universalium

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