jargonize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1803 intransitive verb to speak or write jargon transitive verb 1. to express in jargon 2. to make into jargon

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • jargonize — (Amer.) v. use terms characteristic of a specific group or profession; speak gibberish; speak a language which has been corrupted or simplified from its original form (also jargonise) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • jargonize — [jär′gən īz΄] vi. jargonized, jargonizing to talk or write in jargon vt. to express in jargon …   English World dictionary

  • jargonize — jargon ► NOUN ▪ words or expressions used by a particular group that are difficult for others to understand. DERIVATIVES jargonistic adjective jargonize (also jargonise) verb. ORIGIN originally in the sense «twittering, chattering»: from Old… …   English terms dictionary

  • jargonize — jargonization, n. /jahr geuh nuyz /, v., jargonized, jargonizing. v.i. 1. to talk jargon or a jargon. v.t. 2. to translate into jargon. Also, esp. Brit., jargonise. [1795 1805; JARGON1 + IZE] * * * …   Universalium

  • jargonize — jar·gon·ize …   English syllables

  • jargonize — jar•gon•ize [[t]ˈdʒɑr gəˌnaɪz[/t]] v. ized, iz•ing 1) to talk or write jargon or a jargon 2) to render as jargon; translate into jargon • Etymology: 1795–1805 jar gon•i•za′tion, n …   From formal English to slang

  • jargonize — ˈ ̷ ̷ ̷ ̷ˌnīz verb ( ed/ ing/ s) intransitive verb : to speak or write jargon transitive verb 1. : to express in jargon 2. : to make into jargon or into a jargon developed a jargonized form of Dutch …   Useful english dictionary

  • jargonizes — jargonize (Amer.) v. use terms characteristic of a specific group or profession; speak gibberish; speak a language which has been corrupted or simplified from its original form (also jargonise) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • jargonizing — jargonize (Amer.) v. use terms characteristic of a specific group or profession; speak gibberish; speak a language which has been corrupted or simplified from its original form (also jargonise) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • jargon — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French jargun, gargon Date: 14th century 1. a. confused unintelligible language b. a strange, outlandish, or barbarous language or dialect c. a hybrid language or dialect simplified in vocabulary and… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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