irradicable
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin irradicabilis, from Latin in- + radic-, radix root — more at root Date: 1728 impossible to eradicate ; deep-rooted <
irradicable hatred
>
irradicably adverb

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • irradicable — 1728, from IR (Cf. ir ) not + RADICABLE (Cf. radicable) …   Etymology dictionary

  • irradicable — irradicably, adv. /i rad i keuh beuhl/, adj. ineradicable. [1720 30; IR 2 + L radic(ari) to grow roots, take root (taken incorrectly as to root up ) + ABLE. See ERADICABLE] * * * …   Universalium

  • irradicable — (Roget s Thesaurus II) adjective Firmly established by long standing: confirmed, deep rooted, deep seated, entrenched, hard shell, ineradicable, ingrained, inveterate, set1, settled. See CONTINUE …   English dictionary for students

  • irradicable — ir·rad·i·ca·ble …   English syllables

  • irradicable — …   Useful english dictionary

  • irradicably — adverb see irradicable …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • irradicably — See irradicable. * * * …   Universalium

  • wrād- — Branch, root. Oldest form *wreə₂d , colored to *wraə₂d , contracted to *wrād . Derivatives include root1, wort, radish, and licorice. I. Basic form *wrād . root1; rutabaga, from Old Norse rōt, root, from Germa …   Universalium

  • deep-seated — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adj. established, inveterate, rooted. See habit. II (Roget s 3 Superthesaurus) a. deep rooted, ingrained, *dyed in the wool, inherent. ANT.: learned, acquired, extrinsic III (Roget s Thesaurus II)… …   English dictionary for students

  • ingrained — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adj. fixed, implanted; inveterate, chronic, established. See habit. II (Roget s IV) modif. Syn. congenital, inborn, indelible, fixed; see established 1 , inherent . III (Roget s 3 Superthesaurus) a. deep …   English dictionary for students

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”