insist
verb Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French insister, from Latin insistere to stand upon, persist, from in- + sistere to take a stand; akin to Latin stare to stand — more at stand Date: 1586 intransitive verb 1. to be emphatic, firm, or resolute about something intended, demanded, or required <
they insist on going
>
2. archaic persist transitive verb to maintain in a persistent or positive manner <
insisted that the story was true
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • insist — takes several constructions in current English in the meaning ‘to assert as a demand’: you can insist on something (or on doing something), you can insist that something be done (subjunctive, with that optionally omitted, or with should as an… …   Modern English usage

  • Insist — In*sist , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Insisted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Insisting}.] [F. insister, L. insistere to set foot upon, follow, persist; pref. in in + sistere to stand, cause to stand. See {Stand}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To stand or rest; to find… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • insist — I verb accent, accentuate, argue, be obstinate, be peremptory, be resolute, bid, brook no denial, command, contend, demand, dictate, efflagitare, emphasize, enforce, enjoin, exact, exert pressure, exhort, exposcere, force upon, importune, impose …   Law dictionary

  • insist — ► VERB 1) demand or state forcefully, without accepting refusal or contradiction. 2) (insist on) persist in (doing). ORIGIN Latin insistere persist , from sistere stand …   English terms dictionary

  • insist — (v.) 1580s, from L. insistere persist, dwell upon, stand upon, from in upon (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + sistere take a stand (see ASSIST (Cf. assist)). Perhaps in some cases a back formation from insistence. Related: Insisted; insisting …   Etymology dictionary

  • insist — [v] order and expect; claim assert, asseverate, aver, be firm, contend, demand, hold, importune, lay down the law*, maintain, persist, press, reiterate, repeat, request, require, stand firm, swear, take a stand*, urge, vow; concepts 49,53 Ant.… …   New thesaurus

  • insist — [in sist′] vi. [MFr insister < L insistere, to stand on, pursue diligently, persist < in , in, on + sistere, to stand, redupl. of stare, STAND] to take and maintain a stand or make a firm demand: often with on or upon vt. 1. to demand… …   English World dictionary

  • insist — in|sist [ ın sıst ] verb intransitive or transitive *** 1. ) to say very firmly that something must happen or be done: You must see a doctor immediately; I insist. Roger, he insisted, we must hurry. insist (that): She insisted that we stay at her …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • insist — in|sist W2S3 [ınˈsıst] v [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: insistere [i] to stand on, continue with determination , from sistere to stand ] 1.) to say firmly and often that something is true, especially when other people think it may not be true …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • insist */*/*/ — UK [ɪnˈsɪst] / US verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms insist : present tense I/you/we/they insist he/she/it insists present participle insisting past tense insisted past participle insisted 1) to say very firmly that something must happen… …   English dictionary

  • insist — /In sIst/ verb (I) 1 to say firmly and repeatedly that something is true, especially when other people think it may not be true: insist that: Mike insisted that he was right. (+ to): She kept insisting on her innocence. 2 to demand that something …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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