noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1894 abnormal decrease of sugar in the blood • hypoglycemic adjective or noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • hypoglycemia — 1893, from Latinized form of Greek elements hypo under (see HYPO (Cf. hypo )) + glykys sweet (see GLUCOSE (Cf. glucose)) + haima blood (see EMIA (Cf. emia)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • hypoglycemia — [hī΄pōglī sē′mē ə, hip΄ōglī sē′mē ə] n. [ModL < HYPO + Gr glykys (see GLYCERIN) + EMIA] an abnormally low concentration of sugar in the blood hypoglycemic [hī΄pō glī sē′mik, hip΄ō glī sē′mik] adj …   English World dictionary

  • Hypoglycemia — For information about the popular condition that does not involve measured low glucose, see hypoglycemia (common usage). Hypoglycemia Classification and external resources Glucose meter ICD 10 …   Wikipedia

  • hypoglycemia — hypoglycemic, adj. /huy poh gluy see mee euh/, n. Pathol. an abnormally low level of glucose in the blood. [1890 95; HYPO + GLYC + EMIA] * * * Below normal levels of blood glucose, quickly reversed by administration of oral or intravenous glucose …   Universalium

  • hypoglycemia — noun A low level of blood glucose …   Wiktionary

  • hypoglycemia — 1. Symptoms resulting from low blood glucose (normal glucose range 60–100 mg/dL (3.3 to 5.6 mmol/L)) which are either autonomic or neuroglycopenic. Autonomic symptoms include sweating, trembling, feelings of warmth, anxiety, and nausea.… …   Medical dictionary

  • hypoglycemia — hy|po|gly|ce|mi|a [ ,haıpouglaı simiə ] noun uncount MEDICAL a medical condition in which someone has a low level of sugar in their blood …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • hypoglycemia — n. deficiency of sugar in the blood (Medicine) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • hypoglycemia — hy·po·glycemia …   English syllables

  • hypoglycemia — hy•po•gly•ce•mi•a [[t]ˌhaɪ poʊ glaɪˈsi mi ə[/t]] n. pat an abnormally low level of glucose in the blood • Etymology: 1890–95; hypo +glyc(o) + emia hy po•gly•ce′mic, adj …   From formal English to slang

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