hold to
phrasal to give firm assent to ; adhere to strongly <
holds to his promise
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • hold\ to — v. phr. 1a. or hold to To continue to hold or keep; hold tightly. When Jane played horse with her father, she held on to him tightly. The teacher said that if we believed something was true and good we should hold on to it. The old man held on to …   Словарь американских идиом

  • hold to — See: HOLD ON TO …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • hold to — See: HOLD ON TO …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To hold to — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hold to blame — index fault Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • Hold to a Dream — Infobox Album | Name = New Grass Revival Type = Album Artist = New Grass Revival Released = Original : 1987 Remastered : 2001 Recorded = 1987 The Nashville Sound Connection and Sound Emporium Studios, Nashville, Tennessee Genre = Progressive… …   Wikipedia

  • hold to account — phrasal to hold responsible …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Hold — Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough! Shak …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold on — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold up — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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