hold to
phrasal to give firm assent to ; adhere to strongly <
holds to his promise
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • hold to — See: HOLD ON TO …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • hold to — See: HOLD ON TO …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To hold to — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold to a Dream — Infobox Album | Name = New Grass Revival Type = Album Artist = New Grass Revival Released = Original : 1987 Remastered : 2001 Recorded = 1987 The Nashville Sound Connection and Sound Emporium Studios, Nashville, Tennessee Genre = Progressive… …   Wikipedia

  • hold to account — phrasal to hold responsible …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Hold — Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough! Shak …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold on — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold up — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hold forth — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hold in — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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