high table
noun Date: 1602 an elevated table in the dining room of a British college for use by the master and fellows and distinguished guests

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • high table — ► NOUN Brit. ▪ a table in a dining hall at which high ranking people, such as the fellows of a college, sit …   English terms dictionary

  • high table — n [singular, U] BrE the table where the most important people at a formal occasion sit = ↑head table …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • high table — n. [often H T ] Brit. the table, usually elevated, in the dining hall of a college or school where the head and important teachers and guests are seated …   English World dictionary

  • High Table — At Oxford, Cambridge, and Durham colleges and other, more traditional, academic institutions High Table is a table for the use of fellows (members of the Senior Common Room) and their guests. The table is normally on a raised platform and at the… …   Wikipedia

  • high table — noun a dining table in a dining hall raised on a platform; seats are reserved for distinguished persons • Hypernyms: ↑dining table, ↑board • Part Holonyms: ↑dining hall * * * ˌhigh ˈtable [high table] …   Useful english dictionary

  • high table — high′ ta ble n. brit. the table in the dining hall of a British college reserved for senior members and guests • Etymology: 1300–50 …   From formal English to slang

  • high table — Brit. the table in the dining hall of a college, reserved for senior members of the college and distinguished guests. [1300 50; ME] * * * …   Universalium

  • high table — noun Brit. a table in a dining hall at which important people, such as the fellows of a college, sit …   English new terms dictionary

  • high table — noun (U) BrE the table where the most important people at a formal occasion sit …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • high table — UK / US noun [uncountable] British a table at a formal meal where the most important people eat, for example at a traditional university such as Oxford …   English dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”