to heel
phrasal 1. close behind 2. into agreement or line

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • to\ heel — • to heel • bring to heel • come to heel adj. phr. 1. Close behind. The dog ran after a rabbit, but Jack brought him to heel. 2. Under control; to obedience. When Peter was sixteen, he thought he could do as he pleased, but his father cut off his …   Словарь американских идиом

  • to heel — adverb 1. : close to the heels : close behind at a word from his owner the dog moved to heel 2. : into agreement, control, or subjection : into line the Commons, realizing that he was master still, came to heel J.H.Plumb his disciplined mind,… …   Useful english dictionary

  • to heel — {adj. phr.} 1. Close behind. * /The dog ran after a rabbit, but Jack brought him to heel./ 2. Under control; to obedience. * /When Peter was sixteen, he thought he could do as he pleased, but his father cut off his allowance, and Peter soon came… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • to heel — {adj. phr.} 1. Close behind. * /The dog ran after a rabbit, but Jack brought him to heel./ 2. Under control; to obedience. * /When Peter was sixteen, he thought he could do as he pleased, but his father cut off his allowance, and Peter soon came… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • to heel — under control The army brought the citizens to heel when they entered the town …   Idioms and examples

  • to heel — idi a) close behind b) under control or subjugation …   From formal English to slang

  • bring\ to\ heel — • to heel • bring to heel • come to heel adj. phr. 1. Close behind. The dog ran after a rabbit, but Jack brought him to heel. 2. Under control; to obedience. When Peter was sixteen, he thought he could do as he pleased, but his father cut off his …   Словарь американских идиом

  • come\ to\ heel — • to heel • bring to heel • come to heel adj. phr. 1. Close behind. The dog ran after a rabbit, but Jack brought him to heel. 2. Under control; to obedience. When Peter was sixteen, he thought he could do as he pleased, but his father cut off his …   Словарь американских идиом

  • come to heel — to stop behaving in a way that annoys someone in authority and to start obeying their orders. A few government rebels refused to come to heel and had to be expelled from the party …   New idioms dictionary

  • bring someone to heel — bring (someone) to heel to force someone to obey you. Western politicians opposed the president s effort to bring the Supreme Court to heel. Etymology: based on the literal meaning of bring to heel (= to order a dog to walk close behind you) …   New idioms dictionary

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