antiderivative
noun Date: circa 1942 indefinite integral

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • Antiderivative — In calculus, an antiderivative, primitive or indefinite integral [Antiderivatives are also called general integrals, and sometimes integrals. The latter term is generic, and refers not only to indefinite integrals (antiderivatives), but also to… …   Wikipedia

  • antiderivative — | ̷ ̷(ˌ) ̷ ̷ ̷ ̷| ̷ ̷ ̷ ̷ ̷ ̷ noun Etymology: anti (I) + derivative : the inverse of a given mathematical function which can be obtained by differentiating the inverse F(x) is the antiderivative of f(x) …   Useful english dictionary

  • antiderivative — /an tee deuh riv euh tiv, an tuy /, n. See indefinite integral. [1940 45; ANTI + DERIVATIVE] * * * …   Universalium

  • antiderivative — noun an indefinite integral …   Wiktionary

  • antiderivative — an·ti·de·riv·a·tive …   English syllables

  • antiderivative — an•ti•de•riv•a•tive [[t]ˌæn ti dəˈrɪv ə tɪv, ˌæn taɪ [/t]] n. math. indefinite integral • Etymology: 1940–45 …   From formal English to slang

  • Antiderivative (complex analysis) — In complex analysis, a branch of mathematics, the antiderivative, or primitive, of a complex valued function g is a function whose complex derivative is g. More precisely, given an open set U in the complex plane and a function the antiderivative …   Wikipedia

  • Integral — This article is about the concept of integrals in calculus. For the set of numbers, see integer. For other uses, see Integral (disambiguation). A definite integral of a function can be represented as the signed area of the region bounded by its… …   Wikipedia

  • Risch algorithm — The Risch algorithm, named after Robert H. Risch, is an algorithm for the calculus operation of indefinite integration (i.e. finding antiderivatives). The algorithm transforms the problem of integration into a problem in algebra. It is based on… …   Wikipedia

  • Constant of integration — In calculus, the indefinite integral of a given function (i.e., the set of all antiderivatives of the function) is only defined up to an additive constant, the constant of integration.[1][2] This constant expresses an ambiguity inherent in the… …   Wikipedia

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