go to one's head
phrasal 1. to cause one to become confused, excited, or dizzy 2. to cause one to become conceited or overconfident

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • go to one's head — {v. phr.} 1. To make one dizzy. * /Beer and wine go to a person s head./ * /Looking out the high window went to the woman s head./ 2. To make someone too proud; make a person think he is too important. * /Being the star player went to John s head …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • go to one's head — {v. phr.} 1. To make one dizzy. * /Beer and wine go to a person s head./ * /Looking out the high window went to the woman s head./ 2. To make someone too proud; make a person think he is too important. * /Being the star player went to John s head …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • go over one's head — {v. phr.} 1. To be too difficult to understand. * /Penny complains that what her math teacher says simply goes over her head./ 2. To do something without the permission of one s superior. * /Fred went over his boss s head when he signed the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • go over one's head — {v. phr.} 1. To be too difficult to understand. * /Penny complains that what her math teacher says simply goes over her head./ 2. To do something without the permission of one s superior. * /Fred went over his boss s head when he signed the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To lose one's head — Head Head (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he[ a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h[ o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To show one's head — Head Head (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he[ a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h[ o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To lose one's head — Lose Lose (l[=oo]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lost} (l[o^]st; 115) p. pr. & vb. n. {Losing} (l[=oo]z [i^]ng).] [OE. losien to loose, be lost, lose, AS. losian to become loose; akin to OE. leosen to lose, p. p. loren, lorn, AS. le[ o]san, p. p. loren… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To be out of one's head — Head Head (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he[ a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h[ o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come to one's self — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • out of one's head — or[out of one s mind] or[out of one s senses] also[off one s head] {adj. phr.}, {informal} Acting in a crazy way; especially, wildly crazy. * /The patient was feverish and out of his head and had to be watched./ * /Her friends thought she was out …   Dictionary of American idioms

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”