girn
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, alteration of grinnen to grin, snarl Date: 12th century chiefly Scottish snarlgirn noun, chiefly Scottish

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Girn — Girn, v. i. [See {Grin}, n.] To grin. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • girn — girn·ie; girn; …   English syllables

  • girn — [gʉrn, girn] n., vi., vt. [ME girnen, var. of grennen: see GRIN] [Dial., Chiefly Brit.] snarl; grimace …   English World dictionary

  • girn — a snare or running line, often used for catching trout in deep pools (Scottish dialect). Also see gird an girns …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • girn — girn1 /gerrn/, v.i., v.t., n. Scot. grin1. girn2 /gerrn/, n., v.t. Scot. grin2. * * * …   Universalium

  • girn — I Scottish Vernacular Dictionary To moan or to pull a face II Cleveland Dialect List to grin; to snarl III North Country (Newcastle) Words the Northern word for grin …   English dialects glossary

  • Girn — complain fretfully babies …   Scottish slang

  • girn — 1) grin 2) ring …   Anagrams dictionary

  • girn — verb variant spelling of gurn …   English new terms dictionary

  • girn — Verb. To complain, to moan, to whinge. E.g. If you don t stop girning we won t go to the cinema and you can go to bed early. Also gurn . Scottish use …   English slang and colloquialisms

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