Geat
noun Etymology: Old English Gēat Date: before 12th century a member of a Scandinavian people of southern Sweden to which the legendary hero Beowulf belonged • Geatish adjective

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • geat — geat; or·geat; geat·ish; …   English syllables

  • Geat — (g[=e]t), n. [See {Gate} a door.] (Founding) The channel or spout through which molten metal runs into a mold in casting. [Written also {git}, {gate}.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Geat — (gēt, yăt) n. A member of an ancient Germanic people of southern Sweden conquered by the Swedes in the sixth century A.D.   [Old English Gēat.] * * * …   Universalium

  • geat — Gate Gate (g[=a]t), n. [OE. [yogh]et, [yogh]eat, giat, gate, door, AS. geat, gat, gate, door; akin to OS., D., & Icel. gat opening, hole, and perh. to E. gate a way, gait, and get, v. Cf. {Gate} a way, 3d {Get}.] 1. A large door or passageway in… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Geat — m ( es/ as) Geat, Jute …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • Geat — noun A member of a North Germanic tribe formerly occupying modern in Sweden …   Wiktionary

  • geat — n ( es/gatu) gate, door, opening …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • géat — past 3rd sing of géotan …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • geat — gate …   The Old English to English

  • geat — …   Useful english dictionary

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