ganister
also gannister noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1811 a fine-grained quartzite used in the manufacture of refractory brick

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Ganister — Gan is*ter, Gannister Gan nis*ter, n. (Mech.) A refractory material consisting of crushed or ground siliceous stone, mixed with fire clay; used for lining Bessemer converters; also used for macadamizing roads. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ganister — Ganister, s. Mauersteine …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Ganister — Ganister, ein hochfeuerfester Ton aus der oberen Steinkohlenformation in Südwales (England). Leppla …   Lexikon der gesamten Technik

  • Ganíster — Ganíster, kieseliges Gestein, dient, fein gemahlen und mit Ton vermengt, zum Auskleiden der Bessemerbirnen etc …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • ganister — [gan′is tər] n. [Ger dial. ganster < MHG, a spark, akin to OE gnast, spark: see GNEISS] a hard, siliceous sedimentary rock sometimes found underlying coal beds, used in making brick for refractory linings of metallurgical furnaces …   English World dictionary

  • Ganister — As defined in Jackson (1997), a ganister is hard, fine grained quartzose sandstone, or orthoquartzite, used in the manufacture of silica brick typically used to line furnaces. Ganisters are cemented with secondary silica and typically have a… …   Wikipedia

  • ganister — /gan euh steuhr/, n. 1. a highly refractory, siliceous rock used to line furnaces. 2. a synthetic product similar to this rock, made by mixing ground quartz with a bonding material. [1805 15; orig. uncert.] * * * …   Universalium

  • ganister — noun /ɡænɪstər/ A hard, fine grained sandstone, used in manufacturing silica bricks for lining furnaces …   Wiktionary

  • ganister — n. type of siliceous stone used to line furnaces …   English contemporary dictionary

  • ganister — [ ganɪstə] noun a close grained, hard siliceous rock used in northern England for furnace linings. Origin C19: of unknown origin …   English new terms dictionary

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