gambrel roof

gambrel roof
noun Date: 1765 a roof with a lower steeper slope and an upper less steep one on each of its two sides — see roof illustration

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Gambrel roof — Gambrel Gam brel, n. [OF. gambe, jambe leg, F. jambe. Cf. {Cambrel}, {Chambrel}, and see {Gambol}. n.] 1. The hind leg of a horse. [1913 Webster] 2. A stick crooked like a horse s hind leg; used by butchers in suspending slaughtered animals.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • gambrel roof — ☆ gambrel roof n. a roof with two slopes on each of its two sides, the lower steeper than the upper …   English World dictionary

  • gambrel roof — noun a gable roof with two slopes on each side and the lower slope being steeper • Syn: ↑gambrel • Hypernyms: ↑gable roof, ↑saddle roof, ↑saddleback, ↑saddleback roof * * * noun : a curb roof of the same section in all parts with …   Useful english dictionary

  • gambrel roof — gambrel roofed, adj. a gable roof, each side of which has a shallower slope above a steeper one. Cf. mansard (def. 1). See illus. under roof. [1755 65, Amer.] * * * …   Universalium

  • gambrel roof — /ˈgæmbrəl ruf/ (say gambruhl roohf) noun 1. a roof having a small gablet at the summit of a hipped end. 2. US a mansard roof. –gambrel roofed, adjective …   Australian English dictionary

  • gambrel-roof — n. Curb roof, mansard roof …   New dictionary of synonyms

  • gambrel roof — gam′brel roof′ n. archit. a gable roof, each side of which has a shallower slope above a steeper one • Etymology: 1755–65, amer …   From formal English to slang

  • gambrel roof — noun A roof design having two slopes on the sides and gables in the ends …   Wiktionary

  • Gambrel Roof — arched roof that has two sections on each side that each have a different angle of slope …   English contemporary dictionary

  • gambrel — hipped roof, 1851, short for gambrel roof, so called for its shape, from gambrel horse s hind leg (c.1600), earlier wooden bar to hang carcasses (1540s), perhaps from O.N.Fr. gamberel, from gambe leg, from L.L. gamba (see GAMBOL (Cf. gambol)) …   Etymology dictionary

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