full stop

full stop
noun Date: 1596 chiefly British period 5a

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • full stop — 1. The principal use of the full stop (also called point, full point, and period) is to mark the end of a sentence that is a statement (as in this sentence). This applies to sentences when they are not complete statements or contain ellipsis (see …   Modern English usage

  • full stop — full stop1 n BrE a point (.) that marks the end of a sentence or the short form of a word American Equivalent: period ▪ Put a full stop at the end of the sentence. full stop 2 full stop2 interjection BrE informal used at the end of a sentence to… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • full stop — noun count BRITISH a PERIOD used in writing come to a full stop 1. ) if a vehicle comes to a full stop, it slows until it is completely still 2. ) to end, especially suddenly or unexpectedly …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • full stop — full stops N COUNT A full stop is the punctuation mark . which you use at the end of a sentence when it is not a question or exclamation. [BRIT] (in AM, use period) …   English dictionary

  • full stop — index check (bar) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • full stop — full′ stop′ n. period 6), period 7) • Etymology: 1655–65 …   From formal English to slang

  • full stop — ► NOUN ▪ a punctuation mark (.) used at the end of a sentence or an abbreviation …   English terms dictionary

  • full stop — n. a period (punctuation mark) …   English World dictionary

  • Full stop — For other uses, see Full stop (disambiguation). . Full stop Punctuation apostroph …   Wikipedia

  • full stop — noun a punctuation mark (.) placed at the end of a declarative sentence to indicate a full stop or after abbreviations in England they call a period a stop • Syn: ↑period, ↑point, ↑stop, ↑full point • Derivationally related forms: ↑point ( …   Useful english dictionary

  • full stop — 1 noun 1 (C) BrE a point (.) that marks the end of a sentence or the shortened form of a word; period 1 (5) AmE 2 AmE (singular) the state of being completely stopped, usually in a car: The car can accelerate from a full stop to 60 mph in five… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”