front money
noun Date: circa 1928 money that is paid in advance for a promised service or product

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • front money — ➔ money * * * front money UK US noun [U] FINANCE ► the money that is needed to start a business, project, etc.: »Front money is generally required for purchasing a site. ► the money that is a down payment (= a first payment as part of the total… …   Financial and business terms

  • front money — n. money paid in advance, as in a front end contract …   English World dictionary

  • front money — noun a) Money paid for goods or services in advance, sometimes through an intermediary. I wouldnt have given him any front money. I dont trust him that much. b) Capital which is required in order to establish a business and begin operations.… …   Wiktionary

  • front money — n. money paid in advance; earnest money. □ How much front money do you need? □ I put up a lot of front money and have nothing to show for it …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • front money — front′ mon ey n. 1) bus money paid in advance, as for goods or services 2) bus capital necessary to begin a business enterprise • Etymology: 1925 …   From formal English to slang

  • front money — 1. money paid in advance, as for goods or services, to a commission agent or the like. 2. capital necessary to begin a business enterprise. 3. Also called advance fee. money furnished by a company to a financier under a promise to procure funds… …   Universalium

  • front money — noun (singular) money that is paid for something before you get it …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • front money — /ˈfrʌnt mʌni/ (say frunt munee) noun money paid in advance, as to initiate or develop a project, secure agreement, etc …   Australian English dictionary

  • front money — noun : money that is paid in advance for a promised service or product …   Useful english dictionary

  • front money —  The initial amount needed to start a project …   American business jargon

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