forestay
noun Date: 13th century a stay from the foremast to the foredeck or bow of a ship

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Forestay — Fore stay , n. (Naut.) A large, strong rope, reaching from the foremast head to the bowsprit, to support the mast. See Illust. under {Ship}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • forestay — [fôr′stā΄] n. [ME forstay: see FORE & STAY1] a rope or cable reaching from the head of a ship s foremast to the bowsprit, for supporting the foremast …   English World dictionary

  • Forestay — On a sailing vessel, a forestay, sometimes just called a stay, is a piece of standing rigging which keeps a mast from falling backwards. It is attached either at the very top of the mast, or in fractional rigs between about 1/8 and 1/4 from the… …   Wikipedia

  • forestay — /fawr stay , fohr /, n. 1. a stay leading aft and upward from the stem or knightheads of a vessel to the head of the fore lower mast; the lowermost stay of a foremast. 2. a stay leading aft and upwards toward the mainmast of a sloop, knockabout,… …   Universalium

  • forestay — noun A stay that extends from the top of the foremast to the bow or bowsprit of a sailing ship …   Wiktionary

  • forestay — stay leading from the foremast to the bow of a ship Nautical Terms …   Phrontistery dictionary

  • forestay — n. front rope of a mast (on a ship) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • forestay — [ fɔ:steɪ] noun a rope supporting a ship s foremast, running from its top to the deck at the bow …   English new terms dictionary

  • forestay — fore•stay [[t]ˈfɔrˌsteɪ, ˈfoʊr [/t]] n. navig. the lowermost stay of a foremast …   From formal English to slang

  • forestay — /ˈfɔsteɪ/ (say fawstay) noun a strong rope (now generally of wire) extending forward from the head of the foremast to the knightheads or stem to support the mast …   Australian English dictionary

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