foresail
noun Date: 15th century 1. the lowest sail set on the foremast of a square-rigged ship or schooner — see sail illustration 2. the sole or principal headsail (as of a sloop, cutter, or schooner)

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Foresail — Fore sail , n. (Naut.) (a) The sail bent to the foreyard of a square rigged vessel, being the lowest sail on the foremast. (b) The gaff sail set on the foremast of a schooner. (c) The fore staysail of a sloop, being the triangular sail next… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • foresail — ► NOUN ▪ the principal sail on a foremast …   English terms dictionary

  • foresail — [fôr′sāl΄; ] naut [., fôr′səl] n. 1. the lowest sail on the foremast of a square rigged ship 2. the main triangular sail on the foremast of a schooner 3. a JIB2 …   English World dictionary

  • Foresail — A foresail is one of a few different types of sail set on the foremost mast ( foremast ) of a sailing vessel:* A fore and aft sail set on the foremast of a schooner or similar vessel. * The lowest square sail on the foremast of a full rigged ship …   Wikipedia

  • foresail — /fawr sayl , fohr /; Naut. /fawr seuhl, fohr /, n. Naut. 1. the lowermost sail on a foremast. See diag. under ship. 2. the staysail or jib, set immediately forward of the mainmast of a sloop, cutter, knockabout, yawl, ketch, or dandy. [1475 85;… …   Universalium

  • foresail — noun a) The lowest (and usually the largest) square sail hung on the foremast b) A square fore and aft sail set on the foremast, but behind it, on a schooner or other similar vessel …   Wiktionary

  • foresail — lowest sail set on the foremast of square rigged ship Nautical Terms …   Phrontistery dictionary

  • foresail — fore·sail || fÉ”rseɪl /fɔː n. main sail, sail on a foremast of a ship …   English contemporary dictionary

  • foresail — [ fɔ:seɪl, s(ə)l] noun the principal sail on a foremast …   English new terms dictionary

  • foresail — fore·sail …   English syllables

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