at one's feet
phrasal under one's spell or influence

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • at one's feet — {adv. phr.} Under your influence or power. * /She had a dozen men at her feet./ * /Her voice kept audiences at her feet for years./ Compare: THROW ONESELF AT SOMEONE S FEET …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • at one's feet — {adv. phr.} Under your influence or power. * /She had a dozen men at her feet./ * /Her voice kept audiences at her feet for years./ Compare: THROW ONESELF AT SOMEONE S FEET …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get one's feet wet — {v. phr.}, {informal} To begin; do something for the first time. * /The party was at Bill s house and when Ruth and I got there the party had already started. Jump right in and don t be afraid to get your feet wet, said Bill./ * / It s not hard… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get one's feet wet — {v. phr.}, {informal} To begin; do something for the first time. * /The party was at Bill s house and when Ruth and I got there the party had already started. Jump right in and don t be afraid to get your feet wet, said Bill./ * / It s not hard… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • sweep off one's feet — {v. phr.} To make (someone) have feelings (as love or happiness) too strong to control; overcome with strong feeling; win sudden and complete acceptance by (someone) through the feelings. * /The handsome football captain swept Joan off her feet… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • sweep off one's feet — {v. phr.} To make (someone) have feelings (as love or happiness) too strong to control; overcome with strong feeling; win sudden and complete acceptance by (someone) through the feelings. * /The handsome football captain swept Joan off her feet… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • vote with one's feet — verb To express ones preferences through ones actions, by voluntarily participating in or withdrawing from an activity, group, or process. But Khrushchevs economic plan for the East Germans means a new kind of dependence on their old Russian foes …   Wiktionary

  • throw oneself at someone's head — or[fling oneself at someone s head] {v. phr.}, {informal} To try hard and openly to make a person love you. * /She threw herself at his head, but he was interested in another girl./ Compare: AT ONE S FEET …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • throw oneself at someone's head — or[fling oneself at someone s head] {v. phr.}, {informal} To try hard and openly to make a person love you. * /She threw herself at his head, but he was interested in another girl./ Compare: AT ONE S FEET …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To put one's foot down — Foot Foot (f[oo^]t), n.; pl. {Feet} (f[=e]t). [OE. fot, foot, pl. fet, feet. AS. f[=o]t, pl. f[=e]t; akin to D. voet, OHG. fuoz, G. fuss, Icel. f[=o]tr, Sw. fot, Dan. fod, Goth. f[=o]tus, L. pes, Gr. poy s, Skr. p[=a]d, Icel. fet step, pace… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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