transitive verb Etymology: probably from obsolete Dutch vuisten to take into one's hand, from Middle Dutch vuysten, from vuyst fist; akin to Old English fȳst fist Date: circa 1587 1. a. to introduce or insert surreptitiously or without warrant b. to force another to accept especially by stealth or deceit 2. to pass off as genuine or worthy <
foist costly and valueless products on the public — Jonathan Spivak

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

, (surreptitiously or wrongfully)

Look at other dictionaries:

  • foist — [ fɔıst ] verb foist ,on or foist u,pon phrasal verb transitive usually passive foist something on/upon someone to force someone to accept or deal with something that they do not want: Voters are tired of new regulations foisted on them by… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • foist — has meanings similar to fob off, but it is not followed by off and is not used in this meaning with a person as its object; you can foist something on someone but you cannot foist someone (off) with something: • I can t go around the house… …   Modern English usage

  • Foist — (foist), n. [OF. fuste stick, boat, fr. L. fustis cudgel. Cf. 1st {Fust}.] A light and fast sailing ship. [Obs.] Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Foist — Foist, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Foisted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Foisting}.] [Cf. OD. vysten to fizzle, D. veesten, E. fizz, fitchet, bullfist.] To insert surreptitiously, wrongfully, or without warrant; to interpolate; to pass off (something spurious or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • foist — [fɔɪst] verb foist something on/​upon somebody phrasal verb [transitive] to force someone to accept or deal with something that they do not want: • Decisions have been foisted on the staff by the board of directors. • I keep getting work foisted… …   Financial and business terms

  • foist — [fɔıst] v foist on/upon [foist sth on/upon sb] phr v [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: Probably from early modern Dutch vuisten to take into your hands , from Middle Dutch vuyst fist ] to force someone to accept or have to deal with something that they… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Foist — Foist, n. 1. A foister; a sharper. [Obs.] B. Jonson. [1913 Webster] 2. A trick or fraud; a swindle. [Obs.] B. Jonson. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • foist — foist·er; foist; …   English syllables

  • foist — ► VERB (foist on) ▪ impose (an unwelcome person or thing) on. ORIGIN originally in the sense «dishonestly manipulate a dice»: from Dutch dialect vuisten take in the hand …   English terms dictionary

  • foist — [foist] vt. [prob. < dial. Du vuisten, to hold in the hand; hence, in dicing, to hide or palm in the hand < vuist, a fist, akin to FIST] 1. to put in slyly or surreptitiously, as a clause into a contract 2. to get (a thing) accepted, sold,… …   English World dictionary

  • foist — I verb apply pressure, beguile, coerce, compel, compel to accept, constrain, deceive, fob off on, force, force upon, gull, impose, impose by fraud, inflict, insert surreptitiously, palm off, palm off fraudulently, pass off as genuine, put in… …   Law dictionary

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