noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English faculte, from Anglo-French faculté, from Medieval Latin & Latin; Medieval Latin facultat-, facultas branch of learning or teaching, from Latin, ability, abundance, from facilis facile Date: 14th century 1. ability, power: as a. innate or acquired ability to act or do b. an inherent capability, power, or function <
the faculty of hearing
c. any of the powers of the mind formerly held by psychologists to form a basis for the explanation of all mental phenomena d. natural aptitude <
has a faculty for saying the right things
2. a. a branch of teaching or learning in an educational institution b. archaic something in which one is trained or qualified 3. a. the members of a profession b. the teaching and administrative staff and those members of the administration having academic rank in an educational institution c. faculty plural faculty members <
many faculty were present
4. power, authority, or prerogative given or conferred Synonyms: see gift

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Faculty — Fac ul*ty, n.; pl. {Faculties}. [F. facult?, L. facultas, fr. facilis easy (cf. facul easily), fr. fecere to make. See {Fact}, and cf. {Facility}.] 1. Ability to act or perform, whether inborn or cultivated; capacity for any natural function;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Faculty — may refer to:In education: * Faculty (university), a division of a university or the academic staff of a university * A collective name for the teachers in schools in the United StatesIn other uses: * Faculty (instrument), an instrument or… …   Wikipedia

  • faculty — [fak′əl tē] n. pl. faculties [ME & OFr faculte < L facultas < facilis: see FACILE] 1. Obs. the power to do; ability to perform an action 2. any natural or specialized power of a living organism; sense [the faculty of hearing, speech, etc.]… …   English World dictionary

  • faculty — I (ability) noun ableness, adroitness, aptitude, capability, capacity, cleverness, competence, competency, cunning, deftness, dexterity, enablement, endowment, equipment, expertise, expertness, fitness, flair, gift, handiness, knack, know how,… …   Law dictionary

  • faculty — late 14c., ability, means, resources, from O.Fr. faculté (14c.) skill, accomplishment, learning, and directly from L. facultatem (nom. facultas) power, ability, wealth, from *facli tat s, from facilis (see FACILE (Cf. facile)). Academic sense… …   Etymology dictionary

  • faculty — [n1] ability, skill adroitness, aptitude, aptness, bent, capability, capacity, cleverness, dexterity, facility, flair, forte, genius, gift, instinct, intelligence, knack, knowing way around*, leaning, nose*, peculiarity, penchant, pistol*, power …   New thesaurus

  • faculty — ► NOUN (pl. faculties) 1) an inherent mental or physical power. 2) an aptitude or talent. 3) chiefly Brit. a group of university departments concerned with a major division of knowledge. 4) N. Amer. the teaching or research staff of a university… …   English terms dictionary

  • faculty — noun 1 natural ability of the body/mind ADJECTIVE ▪ higher ▪ the evolution of man s higher faculties ▪ cognitive, intellectual, mental, rational ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • faculty — n. division of a university (esp. BE; CE has school) 1) a faculty of education; law; medicine; science teaching staff (esp. AE) 2) on the faculty (she is on the faculty) 3) a college, university; school faculty 4) the standing ( permanent )… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • faculty — 01. An unknown businessperson has donated over $10 million towards the construction of a new medical [faculty] at the university. 02. Our French professor took the entire class to lunch at the [faculty] club. 03. Chocolate was only accepted by… …   Grammatical examples in English

  • faculty — fac|ul|ty [ˈfækəlti] n plural faculties [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: faculté, from Latin facultas ability ] 1.) a department or group of related departments within a university faculty of ▪ the Faculty of Law ▪ the Engineering Fac …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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