extrapolate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin extra outside + English -polate (as in interpolate) — more at extra- Date: 1874 transitive verb 1. to infer (values of a variable in an unobserved interval) from values within an already observed interval 2. a. to project, extend, or expand (known data or experience) into an area not known or experienced so as to arrive at a usually conjectural knowledge of the unknown area <
extrapolates present trends to construct an image of the future
>
b. to predict by projecting past experience or known data <
extrapolate public sentiment on one issue from known public reaction on others
>
intransitive verb to perform the act or process of extrapolating • extrapolation nounextrapolative adjectiveextrapolator noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • extrapolate — ex‧trap‧o‧late [ɪkˈstræpəleɪt] verb [transitive] formal to separate and examine the facts about something, and to form an opinion based on your knowledge of those facts: • The figures are wildly optimistic, and could only have been extrapolated… …   Financial and business terms

  • extrapolate — (v.) 1874, a back formation from EXTRAPOLATION (Cf. extrapolation) by analogy of interpolate. Said in early references to be an expression of Sir George Airy (1801 1892), English mathematician and astronomer. Related: Extrapolated; extrapolating …   Etymology dictionary

  • extrapolate — [v] infer anticipate, assume, conclude, deduce, envision, figure, foresee, foretell, guess, hypothesize, make an educated guess*, predict, project, see ahead, theorize; concepts 12,15,37 …   New thesaurus

  • extrapolate — ► VERB 1) extend the application of (a method, conclusion, etc.) to different or larger groups. 2) extend (a graph) by inferring unknown values from trends in the known data. DERIVATIVES extrapolation noun extrapolative adjective extrapolator… …   English terms dictionary

  • extrapolate — [ek strap′ə lāt΄, ikstrap′ə lāt΄] vt., vi. extrapolated, extrapolating [L extra (see EXTRA ) + (INTER)POLATE] 1. Statistics to estimate or infer (a value, quantity, etc. beyond the known range) on the basis of certain variables within the known… …   English World dictionary

  • extrapolate — ex|trap|o|late [ıkˈstræpəleıt] v [I and T] [Date: 1800 1900; : Latin; Origin: extra ( EXTRA ) + English polate (as in interpolate)] to use facts about the present or about one thing or group to make a guess about the future or about other things… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • extrapolate — v. (D; intr., tr.) to extrapolate from, on the basis of * * * [ɪk stræpəleɪt] on the basis of (D; intr., tr.) to extrapolate from …   Combinatory dictionary

  • extrapolate — [[t]ɪkstræ̱p(ə)leɪt[/t]] extrapolates, extrapolating, extrapolated VERB If you extrapolate from known facts, you use them as a basis for general statements about a situation or about what is likely to happen in the future. [FORMAL] [V from n]… …   English dictionary

  • extrapolate — verb (I, T) 1 to make a guess about something in the future from facts that you already know: extrapolate sth from sth: It s my job to extrapolate future developments from contemporary trends. 2 technical to guess a value that you do not know by… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • extrapolate — UK [ɪkˈstræpəleɪt] / US [ɪkˈstræpəˌleɪt] verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms extrapolate : present tense I/you/we/they extrapolate he/she/it extrapolates present participle extrapolating past tense extrapolated past participle extrapolated… …   English dictionary

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