extend
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French estendre, from Latin extendere, from ex- + tendere to stretch — more at thin Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to spread or stretch forth ; unbend <
extended both her arms
>
2. a. to stretch out to fullest length b. to cause (as a horse) to move at full stride c. to exert (oneself) to full capacity <
could work long and hard without seeming to extend himself
>
d. (1) to increase the bulk of (as by adding a cheaper substance or a modifier) (2) adulterate 3. [Middle English, from Medieval Latin extendere (from Latin) or Anglo-French estendre, from Old French] a. British to take possession of (as lands) by a writ of extent b. obsolete to take by force 4. a. to make the offer of ; proffer <
extending aid to the needy
>
<
extending their greetings
>
b. to make available <
extending credit to customers
>
5. a. to cause to reach (as in distance or scope) <
national authority was extended over new territories
>
b. to cause to be longer ; prolong <
extend the side of a triangle
>
<
extended their visit another day
>
; also to prolong the time of payment of c. advance, further <
extending her potential through job training
>
6. a. to cause to be of greater area or volume ; enlarge <
extended the patio to the back of the house
>
b. to increase the scope, meaning, or application of ; broaden <
beauty, I suppose, opens the heart, extends the consciousness — Algernon Blackwood
>
<
extending the meaning of the word
>
c. archaic exaggerate intransitive verb 1. to stretch out in distance, space, or time ; reach <
their jurisdiction extended over the whole area
>
2. to reach in scope or application <
his concern extends beyond mere business to real service to his customers
>
extendability nounextendable also extendible adjective Synonyms: extend, lengthen, prolong, protract mean to draw out or add to so as to increase in length. extend and lengthen imply a drawing out in space or time but extend may also imply increase in width, scope, area, or range <
extend a vacation
>
<
extend welfare services
>
<
lengthen a skirt
>
<
lengthen the workweek
>
. prolong suggests chiefly increase in duration especially beyond usual limits <
prolonged illness
>
. protract adds to prolong implications of needlessness, vexation, or indefiniteness <
protracted litigation
>
.

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • extend — ex‧tend [ɪkˈstend] verb 1. [transitive] to increase the period of time for which an agreement, contract etc is effective: • The company decided not to extend his employment contract. • The lease has been extended to five years. 2. [transitive] to …   Financial and business terms

  • Extend — Ex*tend ([e^]ks*t[e^]nd ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Extended}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Extending}.] [L. extendere, extentum, extensum; ex out + tendere to stretch. See {Trend}.] 1. To stretch out; to prolong in space; to carry forward or continue in length; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Extend — Студийный альбом Milanese …   Википедия

  • extend — extend, lengthen, elongate, prolong, protract all mean to draw out or add to so as to increase in length. Both extend and lengthen (opposed to shorten) connote an increase of length either in space or in time, but extend is also used to connote… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • extend — Fowler (1926) and others have castigated the use of extend to mean ‘to give, to offer’ in expressions such as extend a welcome. Fowler wrote that ‘extend in this sense has done its development in America, and has come to use full grown via the… …   Modern English usage

  • extend — [ek stend′, ikstend′] vt. [ME extended < L extendere < ex , out + tendere, to stretch: see THIN] 1. to stretch out or draw out to a certain point, or for a certain distance or time 2. to enlarge in area, scope, influence, meaning, effect,… …   English World dictionary

  • extend — I (enlarge) verb add, aggrandize, amplify, augere, augment, broaden, build up, carry beyond the limit, carry further, cause to grow, continue, deepen, develop, dilate, distend, draw out, elongate, enlarge the scope of, expand, extendere, increase …   Law dictionary

  • extend — early 14c., to value, assess; late 14c. to stretch out, lengthen, from Anglo Fr. estendre (late 13c.), O.Fr. estendre stretch out, extend, increase, from L. extendere stretch out, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + tendere to stretch (see TENET (Cf …   Etymology dictionary

  • extend — [v1] make larger, longer add to, aggrandize, amplify, augment, beef up*, boost, broaden, carry on, continue, crane, develop, dilate, drag one’s feet*, drag out, draw, draw out, elongate, enhance, enlarge, expand, fan out, go on, heighten,… …   New thesaurus

  • extend — ► VERB 1) make larger in area. 2) cause to last longer. 3) occupy a specified area or continue for a specified distance. 4) hold out (one s hand or another part of one s body) towards someone. 5) offer; make available. DERIVATIVES extendability… …   English terms dictionary

  • extend */*/*/ — UK [ɪkˈstend] / US verb Word forms extend : present tense I/you/we/they extend he/she/it extends present participle extending past tense extended past participle extended 1) a) [intransitive] to continue for a particular distance or in a… …   English dictionary

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