adjective Etymology: French or Medieval Latin; French explicite, from Medieval Latin explicitus, from Latin, past participle of explicare Date: 1607 1. a. fully revealed or expressed without vagueness, implication, or ambiguity ; leaving no question as to meaning or intent <
explicit instructions
b. open in the depiction of nudity or sexuality <
explicit books and films
2. fully developed or formulated <
an explicit plan
an explicit notion of our objective
3. unambiguous in expression <
was very explicit on how we are to behave
4. of a mathematical function defined by an expression containing only independent variables — compare implicit 1c • explicitly adverbexplicitness noun Synonyms: explicit, definite, express, specific mean perfectly clear in meaning. explicit implies such verbal plainness and distinctness that there is no need for inference and no room for difficulty in understanding <
explicit instructions
. definite stresses precise, clear statement or arrangement that leaves no doubt or indecision <
the law is definite in such cases
. express implies both explicitness and direct and positive utterance <
her express wishes
. specific applies to what is precisely and fully treated in detail or particular <
two specific criticisms

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Explicit — Ex*plic it, a. [L. explicitus; p. p. of explicare to unfold: cf. F. explicite. See {Explicate}, {Exploit}.] 1. Not implied merely, or conveyed by implication; distinctly stated; plain in language; open to the understanding; clear; not obscure or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • explicit — EXPLICÍT, Ă, expliciţi, te, adj. (Adesea adverbial) Care este exprimat limpede; desluşit, lămurit, clar. ♦ (Despre o funcţie matematică) Care este egal cu o anumită expresie ce conţine numai variabile independente. – Din fr. explicite, lat.… …   Dicționar Român

  • explicit — ⇒EXPLICIT, subst. masc. PALÉOGR. Mot qui indique qu un ouvrage est terminé. Anton. incipit. Quant au septième et dernier ouvrage, appelé, dans l incipit, « paroles secrètes dites par le sauveur à Jude Thomas (...) » et, dans l explicit, « le… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • explicit — explicit, express, specific, definite, categorical are comparable when applied to statements, utterances, and language and when meaning perfectly clear in significance or reference. Something is explicit which is stated so plainly and distinctly… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • EXPLICIT — vox in fine librorum olim addi solita. Hieronym. ad Marcellam, Scire debemus, apud Hebraeos in fine librorum unum e tribus solere subnecti: ut aut Amen scribant, aut Sela aut Salom, quod exprimit pacem ut solemus nos completis opusculis, ad… …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Explicit — (from Latin explicare , to unfold and thus also make visible) can mean: * very specific, clear, or detailed * containing material (e.g. language or film footage) that might be deemed offensive or graphic, e.g. sexually explicit material * the… …   Wikipedia

  • explicit — I adjective absolute, accurate, apertus, beyond doubt, categorical, certain, clear, clearly defined, clearly expressed, clearly formulated, clearly stated, comprehensible, crystal clear, decided, definite, definitus, determinate, direct, distinct …   Law dictionary

  • éxplicit — Latinismo que se emplea en las descripciones bibliográficas, como sustantivo masculino, con el sentido de ‘últimas palabras de un escrito o de un impreso antiguo’. Debe escribirse con tilde por ser palabra esdrújula (→ tilde2, 1.1.3): «El “datnos …   Diccionario panhispánico de dudas

  • explicit — explicit; in·explicit; un·explicit; …   English syllables

  • explicit — [eks plis′it, ik splis′it] adj. [OFr explicite < ML explicitus < L, pp. of explicare: see EXPLICATE] 1. clearly stated and leaving nothing implied; distinctly expressed; definite: distinguished from IMPLICIT 2. saying what is meant, without …   English World dictionary

  • Explicit — Ex pli*cit [LL., an abbreviation of explicitus (est liber) the book (which anciently was a roll of parchment) is unfolded (and, of course, finished ). See {Explicit}, a.] A word formerly used (as finis is now) at the conclusion of a book to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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