adjective Etymology: Middle English everich, every, from Old English ǣfre ǣlc, from ǣfre ever + ǣlc each Date: before 12th century 1. a. being each individual or part of a group without exception b. being each in a series or succession <
every few days
every once in a while
2. obsolete being all taken severally 3. being each within a range of possibilities <
was given every chance
4. complete, entire <
we have every confidence in her

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

(of several)

Look at other dictionaries:

  • every — 1. differences between each and every. Both words denote all the people or things in a group, and both normally govern a singular verb (for some exceptions see each). But each is a pronoun (as in I ll take three of each) as well as an adjective… …   Modern English usage

  • Every — Ev er*y, a. & a. pron. [OE. everich, everilk; AS. [=ae]fre ever + [ae]lc each. See {Ever}, {each}.] 1. All the parts which compose a whole collection or aggregate number, considered in their individuality, all taken separately one by one, out of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • every — ► DETERMINER 1) used to refer to all the individual members of a set without exception. 2) used to indicate something happening at specified intervals: every thirty minutes. 3) all possible; the utmost: every effort was made. ● every bit as Cf.… …   English terms dictionary

  • every — [ev′rē] adj. [ME everiche < OE æfre ælc, lit., ever each] 1. each, individually and separately; each, and including all [every man among you] 2. the fullest possible; all that there could be [given every chance to do the job] 3. each group or… …   English World dictionary

  • every — early 13c., contraction of O.E. æfre ælc each of a group, lit. ever each (Chaucer s everich), from EACH (Cf. each) with EVER (Cf. ever) added for emphasis, as the word is still felt to need emphasis (Mod.Eng. every last ..., every single ..., etc …   Etymology dictionary

  • every — index collective Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • every — each, *all …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • every — [adj] each, all each one, whole, without exception; concept 531 Ant. none …   New thesaurus

  • every */*/*/ — UK [ˈevrɪ] / US determiner Summary: Every is generally used before a singular countable noun. The only exceptions are at Sense 2, where every can be used in phrases like every three hours , and at Sense 3. A noun subject that follows every is… …   English dictionary

  • every — ev|ery W1S1 [ˈevri] determiner [always followed by a singular C noun] [: Old English; Origin: Afre Alc ever each ] 1.) used to refer to all the people or things in a particular group or all the parts of something ▪ We looked carefully at every… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • every — [[t]e̱vri[/t]] ♦ 1) DET: DET sing n You use every to indicate that you are referring to all the members of a group or all the parts of something and not only some of them. Every village has a green, a church, a pub and a manor house... Record… …   English dictionary

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