adjective Etymology: Latin enormis, from e, ex out of + norma rule Date: 1531 1. a. archaic abnormal, inordinate b. exceedingly wicked ; shocking <
an enormous sin
2. marked by extraordinarily great size, number, or degree; especially exceeding usual bounds or accepted notions • enormously adverbenormousness noun Synonyms: enormous, immense, huge, vast, gigantic, colossal, mammoth mean exceedingly large. enormous and immense both suggest an exceeding of all ordinary bounds in size or amount or degree, but enormous often adds an implication of abnormality or monstrousness <
an enormous expense
an immense shopping mall
. huge commonly suggests an immensity of bulk or amount <
incurred a huge debt
. vast usually suggests immensity of extent <
the vast Russian steppes
. gigantic stresses the contrast with the size of others of the same kind <
a gigantic sports stadium
. colossal applies especially to a human creation of stupendous or incredible dimensions <
a colossal statue of Lincoln
. mammoth suggests both hugeness and ponderousness of bulk <
a mammoth boulder

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Enormous — E*nor mous, a. [L. enormis enormous, out of rule; e out + norma rule: cf. F. [ e]norme. See {Normal}.] 1. Exceeding the usual rule, norm, or measure; out of due proportion; inordinate; abnormal. Enormous bliss. Milton. This enormous state. Shak.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • enormous — [ē nôr′məs, inôr′məs] adj. [ME enormyouse < L enormis (see ENORMITY) + OUS] 1. very much exceeding the usual size, number, or degree; of great size; huge; vast; immense 2. Archaic very wicked; outrageous enormously adv. enormousness n. SYN.… …   English World dictionary

  • enormous — index exorbitant, far reaching, flagrant, grandiose, gross (flagrant), major, outrageous, ponderous …   Law dictionary

  • enormous — 1530s, from L. enormis out of rule, irregular, shapeless, extraordinary, very large, from ex out of (see EX (Cf. ex )) + norma rule, norm (see NORM (Cf. norm)), with English OUS (Cf. ous) substituted for L. is. Meaning …   Etymology dictionary

  • enormous — *huge, vast, immense, elephantine, mammoth, giant, gigantic, gigantean, colossal, gargantuan, Herculean, cyclopean, titanic, Brobdingnagian Analogous words: prodigious, stupendous, tremendous, *monstrous, monumental: inordinate, exorbitant,… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • enormous — [adj] very large astronomic, barn door*, blimp*, colossal, excessive, gargantuan, gigantic, gross, huge, humongous, immense, jumbo*, mammoth, massive, monstrous, mountainous, prodigious, stupendous, supercolossal*, titanic*, tremendous, vast,… …   New thesaurus

  • enormous — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ very large. DERIVATIVES enormously adverb enormousness noun …   English terms dictionary

  • enormous — 01. The visit by the President resulted in an [enormous] traffic jam. 02. Russia is an [enormous] country, the largest in the world. 03. She lives in an [enormous] house, with 8 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms and an indoor swimming pool. 04. Céline Dion… …   Grammatical examples in English

  • enormous — [[t]ɪnɔ͟ː(r)məs[/t]] ♦♦♦ 1) ADJ GRADED Something that is enormous is extremely large in size or amount. The main bedroom is enormous... There is, of course, an enormous amount to see. 2) ADJ: usu ADJ n (emphasis) You can use enormous to emphasize …   English dictionary

  • enormous — e|nor|mous [ ı nɔrməs ] adjective *** very large in size or quantity: The enormous birthday cake dwarfed everything else on the table. The stress they re under is enormous. an enormous amount/number/volume etc.: An enormous amount of money has… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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