also indorse transitive verb (-dorsed; -dorsing) Etymology: alteration of obsolete endoss, from Middle English endosen, from Anglo-French endosser, to put on, don, write on the back of, from en- + dos back, from Latin dorsum Date: 1581 1. a. to write on the back of; especially to sign one's name as payee on the back of (a check) in order to obtain the cash or credit represented on the face b. to inscribe (one's signature) on a check, bill, or note c. to inscribe (as an official document) with a title or memorandum d. to make over to another (the value represented in a check, bill, or note) by inscribing one's name on the document e. to acknowledge receipt of (a sum specified) by one's signature on a document 2. a. to approve openly <
endorse an idea
; especially to express support or approval of publicly and definitely <
endorse a mayoral candidate
b. to recommend (as a product or service) usually for financial compensation <
shoes endorsed by a pro basketball player
Synonyms: see approveendorsable adjectiveendorsee nounendorser noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • endorse — en·dorse also in·dorse /in dȯrs/ vt en·dorsed also in·dorsed, en·dors·ing, also, in·dors·ing [Anglo French endosser endorser and Medieval Latin indorsare, both ultimately from Latin in on + dorsum back] 1: to write on the back of; esp: to sign… …   Law dictionary

  • Endorse — En*dorse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Endorsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Endorsing}.] [Formerly endosse, fr. F. endosser to put on the back, to endorse; pref. en (L. in) + dos back, L. dorsum. See {Dorsal}, and cf. {Indorse}.] Same as {Indorse}. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • endorse — (v.) late 14c. endosse alteration, from O.Fr. endosser (12c.), lit. to put on back, from en put on (see EN (Cf. en ) (1)) + dos back, from L. dossum, variant of dorsum. Sense of confirm, approve (by signing on the back) is recorded in English… …   Etymology dictionary

  • endorse — [v1] support, authorize accredit, advocate, affirm, approve, attest, authenticate, back, back up*, bless, boost, certify, champion, commend, confirm, countenance, defend, favor, give a boost to, give green light*, give one’s word*, give the go… …   New thesaurus

  • endorse — [en dôrs′, indôrs′] vt. endorsed, endorsing [altered (after L) < ME endosen < OFr endosser < ML indorsare < L in, on, upon + dorsum, the back] 1. to write on the back of (a document); specif., a) to sign (one s name) as payee on the… …   English World dictionary

  • Endorse — En*dorse , n. (Her.) A subordinary, resembling the pale, but of one fourth its width (according to some writers, one eighth). [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • endorse — *approve, sanction, accredit, certify Analogous words: vouch, attest, *certify, witness: *commend, recommend: *support, uphold, champion, back, advocate Contrasted words: *disapprove, deprecate: condemn, denounce, reprobate, reprehend, censur …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • endorse — in its modern marketing meaning ‘to give one s approval to (a product)’ was labelled by the Concise Oxford Dictionary in 1914 as ‘vulgar in advertisements’. Its original meaning is ‘to write on the back of (a document)’, from Latin dorsum ‘back’ …   Modern English usage

  • endorse — (US & Law also indorse) ► VERB 1) declare one s public approval of. 2) sign (a cheque or bill of exchange) on the back to specify another as the payee or to accept responsibility for paying it. 3) Brit. enter an endorsement on (a driving licence) …   English terms dictionary

  • endorse — Transferring asset ownership by signing the back of the asset s certificate. Bloomberg Financial Dictionary * * * endorse en‧dorse [ɪnˈdɔːs ǁ ˈdɔːrs] also indorse verb [transitive] 1. LAW …   Financial and business terms

  • endorse — [[t]ɪndɔ͟ː(r)s[/t]] endorses, endorsing, endorsed 1) VERB If you endorse someone or something, you say publicly that you support or approve of them. [V n] I can endorse their opinion wholeheartedly. [V n] ...policies agreed by the Labour Party… …   English dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”