empoison
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English empoysonen, from Anglo-French empoisener, from en- + poison poison Date: 14th century 1. archaic poison 2. embitter <
a look of empoisoned acceptance — Saul Bellow
>
empoisonment noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Empoison — Em*poi son, v. t. [F. empoisonner; pref. em + F. poison. See {Poison}, and cf. {Impoison}.] To poison; to impoison. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Empoison — Em*poi son, n. Poison. [Obs.] Remedy of Love. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • empoison — index infect Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • empoison — [em poi′zən] vt. [ME empoisounen < OFr empoisoner: see EN 1 & POISON] 1. Archaic to make poisonous; taint or corrupt 2. to embitter; envenom …   English World dictionary

  • empoison — empoisonment, n. /em poy zeuhn/, v.t. 1. to corrupt: to empoison the minds of the young. 2. to embitter: His own failure has empoisoned him. 3. Archaic. to poison. [1275 1325; ME empoysonen < OF empoisoner. See EM 1, POISON] * * * …   Universalium

  • empoison — (Roget s Thesaurus II) verb Archaic. To have a destructive effect on: canker, envenom, infect, poison. See HELP …   English dictionary for students

  • empoison — v. a. RG. 463 …   Oldest English Words

  • empoison — em·poi·son || ɪm pɔɪzn v. corrupt; embitter; (Archaic) poison …   English contemporary dictionary

  • empoison — em·poison …   English syllables

  • empoison — em•poi•son [[t]ɛmˈpɔɪ zən[/t]] v. t. 1) to corrupt 2) to embitter 3) archaic to poison • Etymology: 1275–1325; ME < OF empoisoner. See em I, poison em•poi′son•ment, n …   From formal English to slang

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