to the effect
phrasal with the meaning <
issued a statement to the effect that he would resign
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • to the effect that — {adj. phr.} With the meaning or purpose; to say that. * /He made a speech to the effect that we would all keep our jobs even if the factory were sold./ * /The new governor would do his best in the office to which he had been elected./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • to the effect that — {adj. phr.} With the meaning or purpose; to say that. * /He made a speech to the effect that we would all keep our jobs even if the factory were sold./ * /The new governor would do his best in the office to which he had been elected./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To no effect — Effect Ef*fect , n. [L. effectus, fr. efficere, effectum, to effect; ex + facere to make: cf. F. effet, formerly also spelled effect. See {Fact}.] 1. Execution; performance; realization; operation; as, the law goes into effect in May. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take effect — Effect Ef*fect , n. [L. effectus, fr. efficere, effectum, to effect; ex + facere to make: cf. F. effet, formerly also spelled effect. See {Fact}.] 1. Execution; performance; realization; operation; as, the law goes into effect in May. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take effect — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To give effect to — Effect Ef*fect , n. [L. effectus, fr. efficere, effectum, to effect; ex + facere to make: cf. F. effet, formerly also spelled effect. See {Fact}.] 1. Execution; performance; realization; operation; as, the law goes into effect in May. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To the face — To To (?, emphatic or alone, ?, obscure or unemphatic), prep. [AS. t[=o]; akin to OS. & OFries. t[=o], D. toe, G. zu, OHG. zuo, zua, z[=o], Russ. do, Ir. & Gael. do, OL. do, du, as in endo, indu, in, Gr. ?, as in ? homeward. [root]200. Cf. {Too} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • to the contrary — {adv.} or {adj. phr.} With an opposite result or effect; just the opposite; in disagreement; saying the opposite. * /Although Bill was going to the movies, he told Joe to the contrary./ * /We will expect you for dinner unless we get word to the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • to the contrary — {adv.} or {adj. phr.} With an opposite result or effect; just the opposite; in disagreement; saying the opposite. * /Although Bill was going to the movies, he told Joe to the contrary./ * /We will expect you for dinner unless we get word to the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To take ground to the left — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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