adjective Etymology: Greek edaphos bottom, ground Date: circa 1900 1. of or relating to the soil 2. resulting from or influenced by the soil rather than the climatecompare climatic 2 • edaphically adverb

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • edaphic — [ē daf′ik, idaf′ik] adj. [< Gr edaphos, soil, earth, bottom (prob. < or akin to hedos, seat, chair < IE * sedos < base * sed , SIT) + IC] Ecol. pertaining to the chemical and physical characteristics of the soil, without reference to… …   English World dictionary

  • Edaphic — In ecology, edaphic refers to plant communities that are distinguished by soil conditions rather than by the climate. Edaphic plant communities include:* Sandy soils: plant communities distinct to sandy, acidic, nutrient poor soils include the… …   Wikipedia

  • edaphic — adj. [Gr. edaphos, soil] Relating to, or belonging to the soil or substratum …   Dictionary of invertebrate zoology

  • edaphic — edaphically, adv. /i daf ik/, adj. related to or caused by particular soil conditions, as of texture or drainage, rather than by physiographic or climatic factors. [ < G edaphisch (1898); see EDAPHON, IC] * * * …   Universalium

  • edaphic — adjective a) Relating to, or determined by, conditions of the soil, especially as it relates to biological systems. b) Soil characteristics, such as water content, pH, texture, and nutrient availability, that influence the type and quantity of… …   Wiktionary

  • edaphic —   lit. of the soil. Any soil properties which affect plant growth and distribution …   Geography glossary

  • edaphic — [ɪ dafɪk] adjective Ecology of, produced by, or influenced by the soil. Origin C19: coined in Ger. from Gk edaphos floor + ic …   English new terms dictionary

  • edaphic —   Relating to the soil environment, e.g. soil structure, quality, pH, etc …   Expanded glossary of Cycad terms

  • edaphic — edaph·ic …   English syllables

  • edaphic — e•daph•ic [[t]ɪˈdæf ɪk[/t]] adj. agr. related to or caused by particular soil conditions, as of texture or drainage, rather than physiographic or climatic factors • Etymology: < G edaphisch (1898) < Gk édaph(os) ground, soil + G isch… …   From formal English to slang

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