verb Etymology: Latin distortus, past participle of distorquēre, from dis- + torquēre to twist — more at torture Date: 1567 transitive verb 1. to twist out of the true meaning or proportion <
distorted the facts
2. to twist out of a natural, normal, or original shape or condition <
a face distorted by pain
; also to cause to be perceived unnaturally <
the new lights distorted colors
3. pervert <
distort justice
intransitive verb to become distorted; also to cause a twisting from the true, natural, or normal Synonyms: see deformdistorter noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Distort — Dis*tort , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Distorted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Distorting}.] 1. To twist of natural or regular shape; to twist aside physically; as, to distort the limbs, or the body. [1913 Webster] Whose face was distorted with pain. Thackeray.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Distort — Dis*tort , a. [L. distortus, p. p. of distorquere to twist, distort; dis + torquere to twist. See {Torsion}.] Distorted; misshapen. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Her face was ugly and her mouth distort. Spenser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • distort — UK US /dɪˈstɔːt/ verb [T] ► to change something from its original, natural, or intended meaning, condition, or shape, especially in a negative way: »Governments are able to maintain discriminatory procurement practices which significantly distort …   Financial and business terms

  • distort — [di stôrt′] vt. [< L distortus, pp. of distorquere, distort < dis , intens. + torquere, to twist: see TORT] 1. to twist out of shape; change the usual or normal shape, form, or appearance of 2. to misrepresent; misstate; pervert [to distort …   English World dictionary

  • distort — I verb bend, camouflage, caricature, change out of recognition, change the face of, conceal, contort, corrupt, deform, disguise, disproportion, dissemble, distorquere, exaggerate, falsify, give a false idea, give a false impression, give a… …   Law dictionary

  • distort — 1580s, from L. distortus, pp. of distorquere to twist different ways, distort, from dis completely + torquere to twist (see THWART (Cf. thwart)). Related: Distorted; distorting …   Etymology dictionary

  • distort — contort, warp, *deform Analogous words: twist, bend, *curve: disfigure, *deface: *injure, damage, mar, impair: misinterpret, misconstrue (see affirmative verbs at EXPLAIN) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • distort — [v] deform; falsify alter, angle, belie, bend, bias, buckle, change, collapse, color, con, contort, crush, curve, deceive, decline, deteriorate, deviate, disfigure, doctor*, fake, fudge*, garble, gnarl, knot, lie, make out like, mangle, melt,… …   New thesaurus

  • distort — ► VERB 1) pull or twist out of shape. 2) give a misleading account of. 3) change the form of (an electrical signal or sound wave) during transmission or amplification. DERIVATIVES distorted adjective distortion noun. ORIGIN Latin distorquere… …   English terms dictionary

  • distort — 01. When people talk about an argument they had, they usually [distort] the truth a bit to make it look like it wasn t their fault. 02. Our television reception is really bad, so the image is quite [distorted]. 03. There s something wrong with… …   Grammatical examples in English

  • distort — [[t]dɪstɔ͟ː(r)t[/t]] distorts, distorting, distorted 1) VERB If you distort a statement, fact, or idea, you report or represent it in an untrue way. [V n] The media distorts reality; categorises people as all good or all bad... [V n] The minister …   English dictionary

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