disinhibition
noun Date: circa 1927 loss or reduction of an inhibition (as by the action of interfering stimuli or events) <
disinhibition of a reflex
>
<
disinhibition of violent tendencies
>
disinhibit transitive verbdisinhibitor noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Disinhibition — is a term in psychology used to describe a lack of restraint manifested in several ways, including disregard for social conventions, impulsivity, and poor risk assessment. Disinhibition affects motor, instinctual, emotional, cognitive and… …   Wikipedia

  • disinhibition — 1927; see DIS (Cf. dis ) + INHIBITION (Cf. inhibition). From the start it was noted as being, often, inhibition of an inhibition …   Etymology dictionary

  • disinhibition — /dis in i bish euhn, in hi , dis in /, n. 1. Psychol. a temporary loss of inhibition caused by an outside stimulus. 2. Chem. removal of an inhibitor. [1925 30; DIS 1 + INHIBITION] * * * …   Universalium

  • disinhibition — noun A lack or loss of inhibition. See Also: disinhibit …   Wiktionary

  • disinhibition — 1. Removal of an inhibition, such as by a toxic or organic process. 2. Removal of an inhibitory effect by a stimulus, as when a conditioned reflex has undergone extinction but is restored by some extraneous stimulus …   Medical dictionary

  • disinhibition — dis·in·hi·bi·tion || ‚dɪsɪnhɪ bɪʃn n. loss of normal inhibitions (Psychology) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • disinhibition — dis·inhibition …   English syllables

  • disinhibition — dis•in•hi•bi•tion [[t]dɪsˌɪn ɪˈbɪʃ ən, ˌɪn hɪ , ˌdɪs ɪn [/t]] n. 1) psl a temporary loss of inhibition caused by an outside stimulus 2) chem. removal of a chemical inhibitor • Etymology: 1925–30 …   From formal English to slang

  • disinhibition — dəs, (|)dis+ noun Etymology: dis (I) + inhibition : loss of a conditioned reflex (as by the action of interfering stimuli) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Online disinhibition effect — In psychology, the online disinhibition effect, also known in popular culture as John Gabriel s Greater Internet Fuckwad Theory (GIFT), refers to the way people behave on the Internet with less restraint than in real world situations. The concept …   Wikipedia

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