dark-field microscope
noun Date: 1926 ultramicroscope

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • dark-field microscope — n ULTRAMICROSCOPE dark field microscopy n …   Medical dictionary

  • dark-field microscope — n. ULTRAMICROSCOPE * * * …   Universalium

  • dark-field microscope — n. ULTRAMICROSCOPE …   English World dictionary

  • Dark-field microscope — A dark field microscope is a type of microscope in which objects are illuminated at a very low angle from the side so that the background appears dark and the objects show up against this dark background. External links *… …   Wikipedia

  • dark-field microscope — noun light microscope that uses scattered light to show particles too small to see with ordinary microscopes • Syn: ↑ultramicroscope • Derivationally related forms: ↑ultramicroscopic (for: ↑ultramicroscope) • Hypernyms: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • dark-field microscope — A microscope (device used to magnify small objects) in which objects are lit at a very low angle from the side so that the background appears dark and the objects show up against this dark background …   English dictionary of cancer terms

  • Dark field microscopy — (dark ground microscopy) describes microscopy methods, in both light and electron microscopy, which exclude the unscattered beam from the image. As a result, the field around the specimen (i.e. where there is no specimen to scatter the beam) is… …   Wikipedia

  • dark-field illumination — [därk′fēld′] n. the illumination of the field of a microscope by directing a beam of light from the side so that the specimen is seen against a dark background * * * …   Universalium

  • dark-field illumination — [därk′fēld′] n. the illumination of the field of a microscope by directing a beam of light from the side so that the specimen is seen against a dark background …   English World dictionary

  • dark-field — dark′ field adj. opt of or pertaining to the illumination of an object by which it is seen, through a microscope, as bright against a dark background • Etymology: 1860–65 …   From formal English to slang

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